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U.S. puts new uranium claims at Grand Canyon on hold

FLAGSTAFF – The federal government announced Monday it is temporarily barring the filing of new mining claims, including for uranium, on nearly 1 million acres (400,000 hectares) near the Grand Canyon.

The land is being set aside for two years so the department can study whether it should be permanently withdrawn from mining activity, according to a notice published in the Federal Register online.

“We have a responsibility to ensure we are developing our nation’s resources in a way that protects local communities, treasured landscapes and our watersheds,” Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said in a statement.

The protections offered by the Interior Department won’t affect uranium mining claims already filed. It’s not possible to prevent existing claims from being developed under the General Mining Act of 1872 unless Congress appropriates money for the department to buy them.

The announcement comes ahead of Tuesday’s congressional hearing on a bill to set aside more than 1 million acres (400,000 hectares) of federal lands north and south of the canyon. The bill’s sponsor, Democratic U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva, and environmental groups had been looking to Salazar for temporary protections at the Grand Canyon while the legislation is pending.

The announcement drew an immediate objection from the mining industry. National Mining Association Vice President Luke Popovich said current laws and regulations are effective for protecting the environment from mining activity.

“So this decision appears on its face to be wholly unjustified and even dumbfounding in view of the near 10 percent jobless rate,” Popovich said.

Environmentalists applauded the decision.

“This decisive action to protect the Grand Canyon sends an important signal that President (Barack) Obama is committed to prioritizing the public interest when it comes to managing America’s natural resources,” said Jane Danowitz, U.S. public lands program director at the Pew Environment Group.

Most of the claims for uranium are staked in the Arizona Strip, a sparsely populated area immediately north of the Grand Canyon National Park known for its high-grade uranium ore.

Operations in the area ceased some 20 years ago, when the price plummeted for uranium used for nuclear energy, weapons and medicine. With prices now around $55 a pound because of renewed interest in nuclear energy, the industry is eyeing restarting operations.

Conservationists contend mining leaves the Grand Canyon vulnerable to environmental damage and that no new operations should be proposed when the old mining sites haven’t been cleaned up.

There are as many as 10,000 existing mining claims on BLM and U.S. Forest Service lands near the Grand Canyon for all types of hard-rock exploration. Some 1,100 uranium mining claims are within five miles (eight kilometers) of the Grand Canyon National Park.

On the Net:

http://www.federalregister.gov/OFRUpload/OFRData/2009-17293(underscore)PI.pdf

http://www.doi.gov/documents/Petition(underscore)Application(underscore)for(underscore)Withdrawal.pdf

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. I think the first thing other than NEPA being done is renegotiate the lease because they were brought on an outdate law and it should be grandfathered in. Toe destroy one of the eight wonders of the world is totally redicules. If it is to be mined, it should be an American company and with people who care for our environment and our water supply and not by a comapany who have nothing to lose(afterall, it not my country and I just want money/nothing more.

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