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Monthly Archives: September 2009

JLBC OKs $7M to complete parks projects

The State Parks Board, with the approval of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee, released about $7 million to finish nearly completed projects that were put on hold in February. About $50 million of the parks budget was swept as part of state budget cuts and about a third of the agency was laid off, said Ellen Bilbrey, a public information officer for the Parks Board. In the process, Heritage Fund grants were suspended.

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Cronkite/Eight Poll: Most Arizonans happy with their insurance but want health care revamped

Most Arizonans think the U.S. health care system needs revamping even though the majority are satisfied with the health insurance they have, according to a Cronkite/Eight Poll released Tuesday (Sept. 29). Fifty percent of those surveyed said the health care system needs major changes and 31 percent said minor changes would do, while 12 percent said the system is fine as is.

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Rasmussen poll puts Goddard over Brewer (access required)

A Rasmussen poll shows Gov. Jan Brewer's approval rating dropping into the 30s, and predicts a November win for Attorney General Terry Goddard if he faces her in the 2010 governor's race. The poll, released Sept. 29, is consistent with other recent polls showing Brewer's approval ratings dropping.

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Not that Terry Goddard

Terry Goddard's PIO Anne Hilby said that she has made several clarifications to previous blog posts that claimed Terry Goddard was representing defendants in the Desert Divas case. Technically, it is true. Goddard did at one time represent one woman arrested, but the Goddard in question is another attorney unrelated to the current Attorney General.

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Senate panel discusses climate change (access required)

Critics of federal cap-and-trade legislation told a panel of Arizona lawmakers Sept. 28 that its effects insofar as reducing global carbon emission at the end of this century will be negligible - similar to turning off one 100-watt incandescent bulb in a football stadium. Some participants and onlookers, though, said the panel was a sham.

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