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35-page pot initiative too complex

Anyone who thinks a 35-page law is a good idea needs a brain scan.

With so many lawyer words in one place, the mischief the marijuana- regulation law is bound to do will be enormous and filled with stupidity.

I would never vote for any initiative so complex that I cannot readily understand it.

It is clear that this proposed law was not written by anyone with the vaguest notion of how medical marijuana is used. Otherwise the clowns who wrote this up would not think that 2.5 ounces of cannabis is sufficient for one week’s care of many ailments – particularly if the patient is eating their medicine instead of smoking it. This alone indicates the depth of ignorance behind their initiative.

Also what if the patient wants to grow enough marijuana for two seasons (anticipating poor health to come)?

The whole thing sounds like a make-work law for narcs.

The only people having any trouble with California’s marijuana law are narcs, prosecutors and other law enforcement people who want to hang on to “marijuana crimes” (that are not crimes) for their own financial benefit. They see a revenue stream drying up and dread going back to real police work – arresting child molesters, rapists, armed robbers, burglars and murderers.
They would rather waste their time putting marijuana criminals in jail who have never harmed anyone.

– Ralph Givens, Daly City, Calif.

One comment

  1. Almost all political bills passed are lengthy and difficult for the everyday citizen to comprehend. In the end, passing medical marijuana in Arizona, the state with some of the harshest marijuana laws in the country, can only be a good thing for those Arizonans with AIDS, cancer, muscular dystrophy, or spinal injuries. And really, 22 pages of specific information for a bill is not that much, considering it’s for a state that will try and find loopholes any way they can.

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