Quantcast
Home / Home news / Colleagues, public honor Border Patrol agent killed in firefight with bandits

Colleagues, public honor Border Patrol agent killed in firefight with bandits

Tucson firefighters unfurl a large flag as part of a public memorial U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian A. Terry.

Tucson firefighters unfurl a large flag as part of a public memorial U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian A. Terry.

Hundreds of law enforcement officers and members of the public attended a memorial service Friday for U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian A. Terry, who was killed last month in firefight with bandits.

“Brian gave the ultimate sacrifice,” said Kurt Martin, an officer who spoke on behalf of the Terry’s family. “He knew the dangers of it, but he went out every day knowing what he was doing was making a difference, not for himself but for others.”

More than 100 vehicles traveled in a motorcade from the Naco station, where Terry was based, to deliver agents to the baseball stadium at Kino Sports Complex. Many of Terry’s fellow officers contributed to the ceremony.

“He died defending those he was charged to protect,” said Jose Verdugo, who trained with Terry in Border Patrol Academy Class 699. “But that was him, and that’s what he did.”

Terry, 40, a former Marine and Michigan police officer, was a member of the Border Patrol’s special response team that tracks bandits preying on migrants and drug runners near Nogales.

On the evening of Dec. 14, Terry and three other agents were patrolling in Peck Canyon, about 10 miles north of Nogales, when they encountered a group of armed men who began firing. Agents took four Mexican nationals into custody but were unable to apprehend a fifth person believed to have killed Terry.

Prosecutors have yet to filed homicide charges against the men, who haven’t been identified, but Alan Bersin, commissioner U.S. Customs and Border Protection, said agents won’t rest until Terry’s family gets the justice it deserves.

“We will finish the job that Brian participated in — the reason he was in those canyons west of Nogales,” Bersin said. “We are determined to restore the rule of law to the U.S.-Mexico border.”

Tim Alvine, national treasurer for the Choir Boys Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club, said his organization will present the Terry family with money raised through donations and motorcycle rallies.

“When one of our brothers does down, we’re there,” he said. “We try to get money to the family within 24 hours of the tragedy to help bring people into town … or even to buy suits for a service.”

Tami Tolman of Yuma said she attended the ceremony on behalf of her husband, who trained at the Border Patrol Academy with Terry and served at his station in Naco for more than a year.

“It was bigger than I was expecting,” she said. “I think it shows great support for the family.”

Creg Davila of Tucson said the memorial gave people the opportunity to recognize the sacrifices made by law enforcement officers.

“I was born and raised in Nogales, I know how it is,” he said. “It’s important to recognize our law enforcement, to pay our respects.”

Terry is survived by his parents, brother, two sisters, five nieces and one nephew.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

 

Scroll To Top