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Capitol Quotes: March 4, 2011

“We have passed four abortion bills. That, LoJacking the uterus, is absolutely the most nanny-state thing that you can do.” — House Minority Whip Matt Heinz, on criticisms that some Democrats’ bills represent a “nanny state.”

“You’d see Arizona State do the very best under that system. I think you’d see the University of Arizona relegated to a lesser tier … and I think you’d see NAU fold up.” — Regent Ernest Calderon, on a proposal to replace the Board of Regents with an independent board of trustees for each university.

“It was a blink of sanity that happened.” — Sen. Paula Aboud, D-Tucson, referring to the Senate’s decision to reject a bill creating a committee tasked to review and recommend the nullification of federal laws. However the next day, the Senate revived the bill.

“If somebody is sitting behind us with a gun, let’s be honest: The only thing that’s going to protect us is [Sen. Lori] Klein.” — Sen. Steve Gallardo, D-Phoenix, during the March 2 debate of a bill that would allow guns to be carried in government buildings, referring to a colleague who carries a concealed pistol.

“I suspect that it’s probably a lot more than just Senator Klein.” — Sen. Rick Murphy, R-Glendale, in response to Gallardo.

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These members of the Martin Gold family are standing in front of the first large steam engine and threshing machine in the Phoenix area. They are, from left, Martin Gold; his daughter, Rose; an unidentified farmhand; Gold’s daughter, Helen; Dave Martinez; an unidentified young woman; and Gold’s stepson, Ulysses Schofield. The photograph was taken during the harvest in July 1914. Gold brought the first steam thresher to Phoenix.

Martin Gold, Phoenix pioneer (access required)

By all accounts, Martin Gold was a humble and hard-working man. He was popular among the immigrant community, especially the Mexicans—who called him Don Martin—because of his facility with languages.