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Tea party T-shirts OK at polls under settlement

The Goldwater Institute says it has settled a federal lawsuit it filed against Coconino County on behalf of a woman who was not allowed to wear a tea party t-shirt into her polling place.

Coconino County agreed to change its rules about electioneering near polling places to settle the case. In essence, that would allow people to wear shirts or buttons as long as they don’t urge a vote for or against a specific candidate, issue or political party.

Goldwater sued after Flagstaff resident Diane Wickberg was forced to cover up her T-shirt during two elections last year.

Her shirt read: “Flagstaff Tea Party – Reclaiming our Constitution Now.”

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. Can’t wait for the next election so I can proudly wear my F#@* the Tea Party shirt.

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