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Police: Many kidnapping reports were poorly chosen

Phoenix City Manager David Cavazos, front, looks at his notes as he and Assistant City Manager Ed Zuercher arrive to announce the reassignment of Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris while an investigation gets underway regarding the police department kidnapping statistics, at City Hall Thursday, March 3, 2011, in Phoenix.  The action came today as the city's police department faces scrutiny for kidnapping statistics that it provided in getting a federal grant.  Harris has come under heavy criticism after a police officer had claimed that the kidnapping figures had been inflated to get the grant.  U.S. Justice Department auditors are reviewing the statistics that Phoenix police provided in order to get the $1.7 million grant to support the squad that investigates kidnappings.  (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Phoenix City Manager David Cavazos, front, looks at his notes as he and Assistant City Manager Ed Zuercher arrive to announce the reassignment of Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris while an investigation gets underway regarding the police department kidnapping statistics, at City Hall Thursday, March 3, 2011, in Phoenix. The action came today as the city's police department faces scrutiny for kidnapping statistics that it provided in getting a federal grant. Harris has come under heavy criticism after a police officer had claimed that the kidnapping figures had been inflated to get the grant. U.S. Justice Department auditors are reviewing the statistics that Phoenix police provided in order to get the $1.7 million grant to support the squad that investigates kidnappings. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Phoenix police say that many of the departmental reports originally submitted to the federal government for grant money to fight border related crimes like kidnappings and home invasions were poorly chosen.

Police officials told the department’s Professional Standards Bureau Wednesday other reports that should have been submitted likely will make the case the grant money was deserved.

A lieutenant assigned to the standard’s bureau says that of the more than 350 reports submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice to represent a problem with border-related kidnappings and home invasions, 222 met the criteria for a kidnapping and 136 did not.

The Arizona Republic reports only 117 met both the kidnapping and border-related criteria.

Phoenix police applied for the $1.7 million federal grant based upon 2008 crime numbers.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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