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Documents released about former Arpaio top deputy

A former top deputy to Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio engaged in immoral conduct and violated a range of office and county policies, according to documents from an internal investigation.

But the report also exonerated David Hendershott of a variety of other misconduct allegations, including some involving posse finances. The documents said certain accusations remain unresolved.

Violations cited in the documents included incompetence, lying, misuse of county resources and attempting to influence an election.

A call to Hendershott’s home for comment wasn’t immediately returned Thursday. Arpaio declined comment on the documents’ release.

Hendershott officially resigned from the sheriff’s office Wednesday. Arpaio fired him last week, effective May 5.

Arpaio’s office on Thursday turned over 300 pages of heavily redacted documents from an internal investigation to The Arizona Republic. They were just a portion of the 1,022-page report prepared by the Pinal County sheriff’s office, which Arpaio asked to examine the misconduct allegations.

Arpaio previously refused to release any portions of the report, citing legal concerns. The Republic filed a special action in Maricopa County Superior Court seeking release of the entire report.

Until Wednesday, Hendershott served for years as Arpaio’s second-in-command — running the day-to-day operations of the massive agency as its highest-paid employee.

The investigation into Hendershott and chief deputies Larry Black and Joel Fox was triggered by a memo written by another top Arpaio official who alleged years of mismanagement by Hendershott. The three were placed on paid administrative leave while under internal investigation for six months.

Allegations that were examined in the probe include abuse of power, nepotism, intimidation, and policy violations by top agency officials.

Black announced his retirement Wednesday. Fox remains on paid administrative leave pending a hearing about his employment.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

2 comments

  1. I was convicted of a D.U.I. (first offense) in 2008 and served two weeks in Tent City. I spent thirty six hors just getting processed into a small cell about 10×10 with thirty guys waiting and literally being afraid of urinating on the mans head who was sleeping next to the toilet. I was placed in a tent with rapists, murderers, and inmates serving life sentences. It smelled like burning flesh due to the animal shelter where they burned dead animals that we were placed next to. After four hours of rest we were chained together like a chain gang (ankles and wrists). We were marched to our work destination that lasted anywhere between eight and eighteen hours. The only other altenative was to go to another cell where staff infection was rampant and inteded and not taken care of at all. I contacted bed bugs and staff infection and was not allowed medication for my PTSD, Acute Renal Dysfunction, and manic, bi-polar, and psychotic depression. Among all of this there is several wrongs I witnessed and am willing to stand up as a Honorabl Discharged Disabled Veteran .

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