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TUSD chief looks for open dialogue

Supporters of the Tucson ethnic studies program in the Tuscan Unified School District protest Monday, May 9, 2011 outside the Arizona Department of Education in Phoenix. About a dozen people showed up Monday and held signs accusing the department of a policy of attacking Arizona Latinos after former school's chief Tom Horne declared the program a violation of state law and called for its elimination hours before his term ended and he became Arizona Attorney General. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Supporters of the Tucson ethnic studies program in the Tuscan Unified School District protest Monday, May 9, 2011 outside the Arizona Department of Education in Phoenix. About a dozen people showed up Monday and held signs accusing the department of a policy of attacking Arizona Latinos after former school

The Tucson Unified School District superintendent wants to bring the anxiety level down and begin civil discussions over ethnic studies.

John Pedicone tells KOLD-TV he’s sent letters to UNIDOS and the Mexican American Studies Community Advisory Board saying he has advised the TUSD governing board to table and not consider the resolution to make Mexican American Studies an elective.

He said that nothing should be done until after the state decides if it considers the program illegal.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction John Huppenthal has launched an investigation into the ethnic studies program after former school’s chief Tom Horne declared the program a violation of state law and called for its elimination.

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