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Arizona to activate emergency center for wildfires

Apache County Sheriff's officers talk with Arizona Dept. of Transportation worker Mike Taylor,  as Kelly Busby, left, starts to move a roadblock along US 191 between Alpine and Springerville, Ariz., on Friday June 3, 2011.  The U.S. Forest Service says at least three summer rental cabins have burned in the Wallow wildfire in the White Mountains of eastern Arizona. Eastern Arizona Incident Management Team spokesman Bill Bishop tells The Associated Press the cabins are located in the Beaver Creek area south of Alpine.  (AP Photo/Arizona Daily Star, Greg Bryan)

Apache County Sheriff's officers talk with Arizona Dept. of Transportation worker Mike Taylor, as Kelly Busby, left, starts to move a roadblock along US 191 between Alpine and Springerville, Ariz., on Friday June 3, 2011. The U.S. Forest Service says at least three summer rental cabins have burned in the Wallow wildfire in the White Mountains of eastern Arizona. Eastern Arizona Incident Management Team spokesman Bill Bishop tells The Associated Press the cabins are located in the Beaver Creek area south of Alpine. (AP Photo/Arizona Daily Star, Greg Bryan)

Arizona will activate its multi-agency emergency operations center on Tuesday because of major wildfires burning in the state.

Spokeswoman Judy Kioski of the Division of Emergency Management says that the center will be activated as a precaution in case the fire situation worsens.

An incident management team is in control of the firefighting effort, and Kioski says the emergency center’s role would be coordination and assessment roles related to consequences of the fire.

Gov. Jan Brewer went to the center in east Phoenix Monday afternoon for a briefing on the fires.

Brewer travelled on Saturday to eastern Arizona to get a briefing on the Wallow Fire.

The blaze is the state’s third-largest fire.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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