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Capitol Quotes: June 10, 2011

“Nothing will persuade me to adopt a failed Keynesian Obama stimulus that is dragging the economy down.” — Rep. John Kavanagh, R-Fountain Hills, on the unemployment insurance extension.

“This is like writing a letter to the editor in an extreme form. A lot of them don’t pan out… but they do have an intimidating effect.” — David Berman, a professor at ASU’s Morrison Institute, on Arizona’s oft-used but rarely successful recall provisions.

“We’ve got a funding cliff coming and we’ve got a truth cliff coming.” — Lisa Graham Keegan, former superintendent of public instruction, on the need for a 2012 ballot measure that would create new funding for schools after Proposition 100 expires in 2014.

“This morning I was in the mountains of North Carolina with no cell service. I mean I’m doing everything I can to get there.” — Senate Minority Leader Schapira, who was calling from Georgia, emphasizing the importance of the topic of the special session set for June 10. Schapira bought a
plane ticket back to Phoenix to catch the special session.

“I think it’s damn foolishness.” — Lobbyist and former Attorney General Jack LaSota, on a state law
allowing nonbinding recall elections against federal officials.

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These members of the Martin Gold family are standing in front of the first large steam engine and threshing machine in the Phoenix area. They are, from left, Martin Gold; his daughter, Rose; an unidentified farmhand; Gold’s daughter, Helen; Dave Martinez; an unidentified young woman; and Gold’s stepson, Ulysses Schofield. The photograph was taken during the harvest in July 1914. Gold brought the first steam thresher to Phoenix.

Martin Gold, Phoenix pioneer (access required)

By all accounts, Martin Gold was a humble and hard-working man. He was popular among the immigrant community, especially the Mexicans—who called him Don Martin—because of his facility with languages.