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Senate OKs vote on Ariz. justice to join US court

Supreme Court justices Robert Brutinel, Scott Bales, Andrew Hurwitz, John Pelander and Michael Ryan. (Photo by Evan Wyloge/Arizona Capitol Times)

The U.S. Senate has narrowly cleared the way for a final confirmation vote Tuesday on President Barack Obama’s nomination of Arizona Supreme Court Justice Andrew Hurwitz to serve on a federal appeals court.

Hurwitz’s departure to serve on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals would give Republican Gov. Jan Brewer a third appointment to the five-justice state high court.

The Senate’s vote Monday to end debate on Hurwitz’s nomination was 60-31, with eight Republicans joining all Democrats but one in voting for cloture.

The 60 aye votes were the minimum needed.

Hurwitz is a Democrat who was a prominent Phoenix attorney when he was appointed to the Arizona Supreme Court in 2003 by Brewer’s predecessor, Democrat Janet Napolitano.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. The article does not identify HOW the Arizona Senators voted.

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