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Judge resets sentencing in Fast and Furious case

In this Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2010 picture, an American flag on a resident's home waves in the breeze near a U.S. Border Patrol truck blocking the road leading to a search area near where U.S. Border Patrol agent Brian A. Terry, 40, was killed northwest of Nogales, Ariz. (AP Photo/Arizona Daily Star, Greg Bryan)

A new sentencing date has been set for a man who admitted to participating in a gun smuggling ring that was being monitored as part of the government’s botched investigation known as Operation Fast and Furious.

U.S. District Judge James Teilborg has reset Jonathan Earvin Fernandez’s sentencing date for Oct. 22.

Fernandez has pleaded guilty to a charge of conspiracy.

He admitted to buying 49 guns for the ring and to claiming that the guns were for him when he was actually making the purchases on behalf of the ring.

He faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison.

Authorities have faced criticism for allowing suspected straw gun buyers to walk away from gun shops with weapons, rather than arrest the suspects and seize the guns there.

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