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DES: No delays for some jobless benefits after all

In this Dec. 6, 2012, photo, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., right, accompanied by from left, Sen. Bernard Sanders, I-Vt., Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., gestures during a news conference the possibility of Americans abruptly their jobless benefits at the of the year on Capitol Hill in Washington, Hovering in the background of the "fiscal cliff" debate is the prospect of 2 million people losing their unemployment benefits four days after Christmas. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

In this Dec. 6, 2012, photo, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., right, accompanied by from left, Sen. Bernard Sanders, I-Vt., Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., gestures during a news conference the possibility of Americans abruptly their jobless benefits at the of the year on Capitol Hill in Washington, Hovering in the background of the "fiscal cliff" debate is the prospect of 2 million people losing their unemployment benefits four days after Christmas. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The Arizona Department of Economic Security says there won’t be delays in payment of extended unemployment benefits after all.

The department says it completed computer programming changes ahead of schedule and averted expected delays announced earlier this week. DES had said payments for the week ending Saturday could have been delayed by up to seven business days as programming is completed and payments are generated.

Officials said the computer changes were needed as a result of the federal government’s last-minute extension of emergency unemployment benefits.

Congress passed the legislation and President Barack Obama signed it this week.

No changes were made to the number of weeks an individual may receive EUC.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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