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Gabby Giffords group starts airing gun-control TV ad

Former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who was seriously injured in the mass shooting that killed six people in Tucson, Ariz. two years ago, sits with her husband Mark Kelly, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, and gives an opening statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on gun violence. Supporters and opponents of stricter gun control measures face off at a hearing on what lawmakers should do to curb gun violence in the wake of last month's shooting rampage in Newtown, Ct., that killed 20 schoolchildren. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who was seriously injured in the mass shooting that killed six people in Tucson, Ariz. two years ago, sits with her husband Mark Kelly, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, and gives an opening statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on gun violence. Supporters and opponents of stricter gun control measures face off at a hearing on what lawmakers should do to curb gun violence in the wake of last month's shooting rampage in Newtown, Ct., that killed 20 schoolchildren. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Former Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords is taking to the airwaves in hopes of persuading Congress to approve gun-control measures.

A political action committee formed by Giffords and husband Mark Kelly says it began airing a TV commercial Monday that shows images of the aftermath of four mass shootings and an on-camera appeal by Giffords for congressional action.

She’s recovering from a head wound suffered in a January 2011 shooting in Tucson.

The ad specifically calls for universal background checks of gun purchasers.

Americans for Responsible Solutions says the ad is airing in Washington and in home districts and states of congressional leaders in San Francisco, Cincinnati, Las Vegas and Louisville, Ky.

Group spokeswoman Jen Bluestein will only say the cost of the airtime tops $100,000.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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