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Homeland Security secretary to visit Arizona border

U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano speaks in the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Office of Air and Marine hangar in El Paso, Texas, on immigration and border security, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Napolitano says Republican lawmakers' insistence that the border be secured before there is immigration reform is a flawed argument. (AP Photo/The El Paso Times, Mark Lambie)

U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano speaks in the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Office of Air and Marine hangar in El Paso, Texas, on immigration and border security, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Napolitano says Republican lawmakers' insistence that the border be secured before there is immigration reform is a flawed argument. (AP Photo/The El Paso Times, Mark Lambie)

NOGALES, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano will be in southern Arizona this week to see security operations at the border.

Napolitano will be joined Tuesday in Nogales by U.S. Customs and Border Protection Deputy Commissioner David Aguilar and U.S. Sen. Tom Carper of Delaware.

Carper is the incoming chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, which oversees the nation’s capital.

Napolitano, Aguilar and Carper will discuss on-going efforts to secure Arizona’s border with Mexico while facilitating lawful travel and trade.

On Feb. 5, Napolitano made a stop to inspect border security in El Paso, Texas.

A bipartisan group of senators — including Arizona’s John McCain — want assurances on border security as Congress considers proposals that would bring the biggest changes to immigration law in nearly three decades.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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