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Former Ariz. congressman to marry partner in DC

Former Arizona Rep. Jim Kolbe (Cronkite News Servict photo by Mary Shinn)

TUCSON — Former Arizona Congressman Jim Kolbe says he and his partner of eight years plan to get married this weekend in Washington, D.C.

The Arizona Daily Star reports that Kolbe and Hector Alfonso, a teacher from Panama, have talked about marrying for a long time. Kolbe says now that Alfonso’s immigration status has been sorted out, the two are ready.

A simple ceremony at the Cosmos Club is planned Saturday. The ceremony will be officiated by a minister with readings and prayers.

Same-sex marriage is allowed in Washington, D.C., and the 70-year-old Kolbe says it’s unfortunate that Arizona doesn’t yet recognize same-sex marriage.

Kolbe is from Tucson and represented southern Arizona in the U.S. House for 22 years. He was elected in 1985 and disclosed in 1996 that he is gay.

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One comment

  1. I was banned from commenting on the Az. Daily Star back in the 90’s for making and inference to his sexuality (everyone knew) when he and his so-called “wife” (a U.of A. Professor) “adopted” a 15 year old “beautiful” Hispanic boy.

    Kolbe, “the Godfather of NAFTA”…destroyed industry in the U.S. with the mass migration of many of our industries leaving the U.S. for Mexico and elsewhere. This magot called himself a Republican, but only because at the time of his serving, the District was Republican. As soon as he left office, he endorsed Democrat Giffords.

    I believe in KARMA and that goes for people like Kolbe. At least this one is an adult.

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