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Lawmakers to review prison expansion project

Expansion of the Lewis state prison complex in Buckeye would be accomplished through five separate bid packages under a plan submitted for review by a legislative oversight committee.

The project involves adding 500 new beds for male maximum-security inmates at a project cost of $50 million.

The Department of Administration say dividing the overall project into separate contracts for differ parts should help get it done faster and at less expense.

Under the Department of Administration’s plan, separate bids would be sought for precast concrete modular cell units and site work.

Separate bids also would be sought for additional housing unit work, wastewater plant improvements and improvements to the prison’s existing kitchen.

The Joint Committee on Capital Review will review the plan on Tuesday.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

8 comments

  1. Arizona does NOT need new prisons! They need to fix what they have and reform broken criminal justice statues and draconian mandatory minimum Sentencing laws that send a non-violent, first offender to 75 years in prison! The mass incarceration of Arizona’s people over educating them is shameful.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/10/opinion/a-conservative-case-for-prison-reform.html

    OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
    A Conservative Case for Prison Reform
    By RICHARD A. VIGUERIE
    Published: June 9, 2013
    MANASSAS, Va. —” CONSERVATIVES should recognize that the entire criminal justice system is another government spending program fraught with the issues that plague all government programs. Criminal justice should be subject to the same level of skepticism and scrutiny that we apply to any other government program.
    But it’s not just the excessive and unwise spending that offends conservative values. Prisons, for example, are harmful to prisoners and their families. Reform is therefore also an issue of compassion. The current system often turns out prisoners who are more harmful to society than when they went in, so prison and re-entry reform are issues of public safety as well.

    These three principles — public safety, compassion and controlled government spending — lie at the core of conservative philosophy. Politically speaking, conservatives will have more credibility than liberals in addressing prison reform.

    The United States now has 5 percent of the world’s population, yet 25 percent of its prisoners. Nearly one in every 33 American adults is in some form of correctional control. When Ronald Reagan was president, the total correctional control rate — everyone in prison or jail or on probation or parole — was less than half that: 1 in every 77 adults.”

  2. Mass Incarceration in America’s Prison System | Global Research

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/mass-incarceration-in-america-s-prison-system/25847

    “Why does the U.S., which has 5% of the world’s population, have 25% of its prisoners?

    Why has the number of prisoners in the U.S. gone from half a million in 1980 to over 2.3 million in the last three decades?

    Why are so many of those incarcerated in the U.S. people of color?

    And why does the U.S. routinely carry out torture in its prisons?

    The truth of the matter—and the bigger context for the inhumane conditions in maximum security units like the Pelican Bay Prison SHU—is that this system, with its police, laws, courts, and prisons is using mass incarceration to enforce oppressive economic and social relations, especially in terms of the systematic subjugation of Black people as a people. And I really encourage people to read the special Revolution issue on prisons, “From the Hellholes of Incarceration to a Future of Emancipation,” which provides a deep analysis of mass incarceration in the United States.

    This system of U.S. capitalism, from its very inception, has, in large part, been built on and developed by carrying out the most brutal oppression of Native Americans, Black people and other people of color.

    This oppression has been woven into the whole fabric of U.S. society, from the days of slavery until today. It has been and is an integral part of the economic and social structure in this country. White supremacy has and continues to maintain Black people in a subjugated position in every aspect of society. And all this has created, and today still maintains a “master class” of white people and a “pariah class” of Black people.

    In this way, the systematic oppression of Black and other people of color has been, and continues to be, part of the very glue that holds U.S. society together—even as it has gone through different changes and been enforced in different ways. The outright ownership of Black people under slavery gave way to Jim Crow segregation and Ku Klux Klan terror. And now we have what has been called “the new Jim Crow” of police brutality and murder and the mass incarceration of hundreds of thousands of Black people.

    The subjugation of Black people is a pillar of this system—a part of the economic and social relations in society, and white supremacy is a key element in the dominant ideology. And this is why this system cannot get rid of the oppression of Black people—because to do so would mean tearing up and undermining the whole economic, social and ideological/culture basis of U.S. society.

    Why has there been such a drastic increase in the U.S. prison population? This has never been in response to crime—crime rates have actually gone down over the last three decades. This has been about control and suppression. It started in response to the mass upsurges among Black people in the ’60s—which shook the system and had a huge impact throughout society. At the same time, globalization and de-industrialization had devastated the inner cities and millions of Black people, especially the youth, who could no longer be profitably employed, were seen by this system as an unwanted, volatile “surplus” that had to be controlled. Concessions from the system, like programs that were supposed to address poverty and inequality, were being snatched back, leading to further impoverishment.”

  3. Very sick and disturbing…

    Private Prison CEO Assures Investors of ‘Strong Demand’ For Beds After Immigration Reform

    By Nicole Flatow on Feb 20, 2013 at 3:30 pm

    As the U.S. private prison industry has grown over the last several years, studies have shown that private prisons are incentivized to lobby for more incarceration. During an investor call this week, the CEO of private prison operator Corrections Corporation of America signaled that incarceration rates would remain high, assuring investors that immigration detention would be a strong source of business for the foreseeable future, ColorLines reports.

    Addressing the prospect of federal immigration reform, CEO Damon Hininger said Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials have said there will “always be a demand for beds”:

    It’s too early to tell exactly what the impact [of reform] is going to be, but again, ICE has always said that there’s going to be a demand for bed space here in the US because of all the things they’re doing both within the interior, on the border, from the people that are released from state prisons that are ultimately need to be deported. […]

    There is always going to be strong demand regardless of what is being done at the national level as far as immigration reform.

    Hininger’s assurances suggest a disturbing financial interest in more incarceration. And this is not the first time CCA officials have expressed optimism about higher incarceration rates. A 2011 report bragged that the industry is resistant to recession and that there is the “potential of accelerated growth in inmate populations following the recession.” CCA facilities have been deemed riddled with violations of state law, and have seen deadly riots break out.”

    Tags: criminal justicePrisonsPrivate Prisons

  4. America’s Corrupt Justice System: Federal Private Prison Populations Grew by 784% in 10 Year Span | Alternet

    http://www.alternet.org/speakeasy/tikkundaily/americas-corrupt-justice-system-federal-private-prison-populations-grew-784-10?akid=10489.212057.-IqOlD&rd=1&src=newsletter846370&t=15

    excerpt: “Such financial incentives to stock corrections facilities naturally leads to widespread corruption. Evidence of such corruption surfaced when two Pennsylvania judges were found guilty of selling juveniles to private detention facilities for millions of dollars. The “kids for cash” scandal, in which innocent children who should not have been locked up were sold for set amounts to the detention facilities, is shocking and harrowing.

    However, even more shocking and harrowing is the fact that we have allowed free market pursuits to infiltrate our system of justice, making such scandals possible. When prisoners become products, we no longer have a justice system. We have an illicit marketplace. We have a corral.

    America has the highest rate of imprisonment in the world. And the private prison industry is a central driving force behind this. Add to this the staggering number of African-Americans locked up, and the private prison industry has essentially created a modern-day slave trade.

    A trade that should never have been allowed to enter our criminal justice system in the first place.”

  5. Pure evil ….

    Kids for Cash: Two Judges, Thousands of Children, and a $2.6 Million Kickback Scheme

    http://www.amazon.com/books/dp/1595586849

    “When thirteen-year-old Matthew appeared in front of Judge Mark Ciavarella for throwing a piece of steak at his mother’s boyfriend, he was sentenced to seven weeks at PA Child Care, a private, for-profit juvenile detention center in northeastern Pennsylvania. Angelia was fourteen when she and a friend scrawled “Vote for Michael Jackson” on five stop signs. Charged with vandalism and defacing public property, Angelia was sent by Ciavarella to PA Child Care without her epilepsy medication and suffered a grand mal seizure her second night. Fifteen-year-old Charlie, arrested for unknowingly purchasing a stolen motorbike, was convicted of a felony and sent to PA Child Care for six weeks.

    Matthew, Angelia, and Charlie are just three children among the thousands who appeared in Ciavarella’s courtroom between 2003 and 2008 and were sent away—often with no attorney present and after only cursory hearings—to a detention facility in which, it later came to light, Ciavarella had a personal financial stake. As Kids for Cash reveals, this miscarriage of justice underscores a multitude of problems with our juvenile justice system, which too often criminalizes standard adolescent behavior, treats adolescents more harshly than if they were adults, and denies them their most fundamental constitutional rights.

    William Ecenbarger, a Pulitzer Prize and George Polk Award–winning investigative journalist who covered the case for thePhiladelphia Inquirer, now gives us the first book-length account of this shocking story. In the tradition of true-crime legal thrillers from The Executioner’s Song to A Civil Action, Ecenbarger exposes a deeply corrupt and broken system that ruined the lives of many children and ultimately led to the judge’s conviction on charges of racketeering, fraud, tax violations, money laundering, extortion, and bribery. Fastidiously researched and utterly propulsive, Kids for Cash takes us deep inside a profoundly flawed legal system, revealing the twisted and haunting realities of America’s juvenile justice system.”

  6. America’s Longest War — a War on All America….The House I Live In Official Trailer #1 (2012) Drugs Documentary Movie HD – YouTube

  7. America’s Corrupt Justice System: Federal Private Prison Populations Grew by 784% in 10 Year Span | Alternet

    http://www.alternet.org/speakeasy/tikkundaily/americas-corrupt-justice-system-federal-private-prison-populations-grew-784-10?akid=10489.212057.-IqOlD&rd=1&src=newsletter846370&t=15

    excerpt: “Such financial incentives to stock corrections facilities naturally leads to widespread corruption. Evidence of such corruption surfaced when two Pennsylvania judges were found guilty of selling juveniles to private detention facilities for millions of dollars. The “kids for cash” scandal, in which innocent children who should not have been locked up were sold for set amounts to the detention facilities, is shocking and harrowing.

    However, even more shocking and harrowing is the fact that we have allowed free market pursuits to infiltrate our system of justice, making such scandals possible. When prisoners become products, we no longer have a justice system. We have an illicit marketplace. We have a corral.

    America has the highest rate of imprisonment in the world. And the private prison industry is a central driving force behind this. Add to this the staggering number of African-Americans locked up, and the private prison industry has essentially created a modern-day slave trade.

    A trade that should never have been allowed to enter our criminal justice system in the first place.”

  8. What the Sentencing Commission Ought to Be Doing: Reducing Mass Incarceration by Lynn Adelman :: SSRN

    http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2273771

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