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State gathering evidence in Arizona license battle

Civil rights advocates have four months to gather evidence in their case to overturn Arizona’s ban on driver’s licenses for young immigrants who have gotten work permits under an Obama administration program.

U.S. District Judge David Campbell said Friday the plaintiffs and the state have until late October to share and gather documents that will help the court determine whether the license ban is legal under the U.S. Constitution’s equal protection clause.

Campbell has denied a request for a preliminary injunction on the ban. Immigrant rights advocates say the policy makes it difficult for young immigrants to do everyday things, such as drive to school or work. They plan to file an appeal in July.

Gov. Jan Brewer says the Obama administration’s immigration policy unveiled last year isn’t federal law.

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