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Yuma County officials to seek review of pot ruling

Pot dispensaries forced to work on cash basisYuma County authorities are expected to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review an Arizona ruling that the county’s sheriff must return marijuana seized from a woman with a California medical marijuana authorization honored by Arizona.

The Arizona Court of Appeals ruled in January that the marijuana must be returned to Valerie Okun because Arizona’s medical marijuana law allows people with medical marijuana authorizations from other states to legally possess marijuana in Arizona.

The Arizona Supreme Court on Monday declined to review the January decision.

The marijuana was found Okun’s vehicle at a Border Patrol checkpoint near Yuma.

State drug charges against her were dismissed after she showed she had authorization under California’s medical marijuana program.

Prosecutors argued that federal drug law invalidates Arizona’s medical marijuana law.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. WHY would State Law ENFORCEMENT officials REFUSE to OBEY the LAW in their own state??? This is crazy – so the “sheriff” FAILS to obey the Arizona Medical Marijuana LAW which he is charged to uphold because HE doesn’t like it? The LAW says NO CONFISCATION of MEDICINE but Yuma officials did anyway. The COURTS threw out the charges. When the simple request was made by a law abiding patient – for the return of their MEDICINE – “sheriff” Wilmot takes the LAW into his own hands and refuses to OBEY a COURT ORDER! Can this stooge be IMPEACHED please…..

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