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Poll: 90% of Americans support United Nations

A new poll out this week has found that nearly 9 in 10 voters believe it’s important for the U.S. to maintain an active role in the United Nations. I’m one of them.

With U.N. Day on Oct. 24, this new poll shows that Americans overwhelmingly support the U.N.’s work, from overseeing the destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons, to building peace in countries emerging from conflict, to improving access to vaccines globally. The findings were released by the Better World Campaign, an organization that works to strengthen the U.S.-U.N. relationship.

The U.N. serves our own national security and foreign policy interests in a big way. By taking an active role in the U.N., U.S. leaders can ensure that American priorities are heard on the world’s stage, including advancing democracy, human rights, and emergency humanitarian aid in times of need. These findings should resonate with all of us — especially our elected officials.

Sally Chewter lives in Phoenix.

One comment

  1. The United Nations is a total waste of time and money. As for the poll, when people were asked which they preferred, Obama Care or the Affordable Care Act, 9 out of 10 people actually answered that they preferred one to the other! Before I would be convinced that 90% of the people really believed we should remain in the UN, I would need to know they actually knew what it was, how it had been performing over the years, and how much we paid to belong!

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