Quantcast
Home / Election 2014 / Arpaio raises $3.5 million in contributions

Arpaio raises $3.5 million in contributions

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpiao, right, greets Phoenix Police Chief Daniel Garcia after a news conference, Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, in Phoenix, regarding Phoenix Police officer Scott Sefranka and a Maricopa County Sheriff's Posse member who were shot Dec. 31, 2013 after an armed robbery of $18,000 from two employees of a strip club.Two men were arrested after the shooting, which came after a police chase ended with a crash. Officer Sefranka and the unmanned posse member are in critical condition. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpiao, right, greets Phoenix Police Chief Daniel Garcia after a news conference, Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, in Phoenix, regarding Phoenix Police officer Scott Sefranka and a Maricopa County Sheriff’s Posse member who were shot Dec. 31, 2013 after an armed robbery of $18,000 from two employees of a strip club.Two men were arrested after the shooting, which came after a police chase ended with a crash. Officer Sefranka and the unmanned posse member are in critical condition. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio raised $3.5 million in campaign contributions over the last year.

Most of the contributions were made by out-of-state donors at a time when Arpaio critics tried unsuccessfully to force a recall election against the sheriff.

Arpaio turned in his 2013 campaign finance report Wednesday.

The contributions replenished Arpaio’s campaign fund, which was depleted after he spent $8 million in donations during the last election cycle. His 2012 re-election campaign marked the second-closest race in his six terms as sheriff.

Arpaio said in a statement that he was emboldened by supporters who were there for him during the recall effort.

While Arpaio has vowed to run for a seventh term as sheriff in 2016, he said in his statement Wednesday that he’s seriously considering a run for governor.

Arpaio has flirted with — but ultimately decided against — running for governor in four gubernatorial election cycles from 1998 to 2010.

If Arpaio decided to run for governor, Arizona law would require him to resign immediately because he isn’t in the final year of his current term as sheriff.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. He represented entrenched power which is disturbing. Time to move into the 21st century.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

 

Scroll To Top