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Home / Governor's Office / Brewer signs 35 more bills, including revenge porn, school vouchers, trampoline safety

Brewer signs 35 more bills, including revenge porn, school vouchers, trampoline safety

Sharing lewd images of a person without his or her consent will soon by a felony in Arizona now that Gov. Jan Brewer signed legislation outlawing the act.

Arizona becomes one of a growing number of states to legislatively criminalize revenge porn, following New Jersey and California, which adopted similar legislation in 2013.

The sharing of such images, an act commonly referred to as “revenge porn,” is most often used to take advantage of a jilted or ex-lover and cause them humiliation and embarrassment by posting the images online.

Chandler Rep. J.D. Mesnard said it was disappointing to even have to sponsor such legislation, but given the technology now readily available, it’s wise for the state to create a way to prosecute in the event a relationship sours.

“It’s unfortunate that we have to bring a bill like this forward,” Mesnard said during voting on the bill in the House. “As technology changes, people invent new ways of hurting folks.”

Brewer signed 35 bills into law this week — including a measure making it a crime to point a laser at an aircraft and a measure to allow state regulation of trampoline parks.

Though she still has three bills on her desk awaiting her signature or veto and is planning on calling the Legislature back in the coming weeks for a special session to buckle down on the overhaul of Child Protective Services, the flurry of bill signings this week signals the imminent end of the 51st Legislature’s second regular session.

Brewer also signed a bill that would help expedite the approval process for parents of some students in the state school voucher program. She signed Senate Bill1237 without a major component, stripped out by an amendment last week. That provision would have allowed the Arizona Department of Education to give all students in the program extra funding that is meant for students who leave charter schools.

The Arizona Empowerment Scholarship Accounts program was created in 2011. SB1237 allows parents of special needs children enrolled in the program to get verification from an independent contractor that would allow them to receive extra funding, instead of going through the school district the child previously attended.

Of the 1,205 bills proposed by state lawmakers this year, Brewer has signed 276 bills into law and vetoed 24.

And while those numbers are mostly on par with previous years, with the big task of CPS reform still looming and the veto of many high-profile bills, many Capitol observers have a hard time defining the major achievements of the year.

“It seems to me like a small ball session. There were not a lot of runs scored,” quipped Barrett Marson, a longtime political consultant and Capitol lobbyist.

But even in the final batch of bills the governor signed, there are several notable measures that lawmakers struggled with for months before finally approving them, including:

Authority for Optometrists

HB2380 authorizes Board of Optometry licensees to prescribe, dispense and administer steroids, hydrocodone pain killers and other drugs and removes the requirement that an optometrist has to work with a primary care physician or ophthalmologist on certain eye problems.

Assisted Suicide

HB2565 modifies the definition of “manslaughter” to include intentionally providing the physical means that another person uses to commit suicide, with the knowledge that the person intends to commit suicide, instead of intentionally aiding another to commit suicide.

Trampoline Safety

To help prevent deaths or injuries from trampoline accidents, HB2179 establishes regulations for “trampoline courts” that would be required to register with the Department of Fire, Building and Life Safety, have an annual inspection and procure insurance of at least $1 million for bodily injury, and maintain specified records.

Yarnell Hill Memorial

HB2624 creates a memorial site honoring the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots who died in the Yarnell Hill fire last year, giving the firefighters’ survivors the chance to buy the site themselves. A half-million dollars to pay for the memorial was included in the state budget.

Laser Pointers

HB2164 increases the penalty for pointing lasers at aircraft, making it a Class 5 felony, with a presumptive sentence of

18 months in prison, to knowingly or intentionally point a laser at an occupied aircraft. The penalty would go to 30 months if the act disables the piolot for causes serious injury to anyone onboard.

— Includes information from The Associated Press.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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