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Home / AZ/DC / US Rep Krysten Sinema donates $53,400 to Phoenix group

US Rep Krysten Sinema donates $53,400 to Phoenix group

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A sexual and domestic violence focused-Arizona organization has accepted $53,400 from U.S. Rep. Krysten Sinema, including donations made to her campaign tied to Backpage.com, which has been linked to prostitution.

The Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence accepted the money Tuesday.

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Sinema

Part of that money comes from donations made to Sinema’s campaign last year tied to Backpage.com founders and former Phoenix News Times executives. Michael Lacey and James Larkin were accused of knowingly profiting from prostitution in 2016.

“I am aware of the source and, given the work we do to combat sexual violence in all of its forms, we feel that the money can be put to good use addressing and basically going against the work that was used to generate that money in the first place,” said Allie Bones, CEO of the coalition.

Friends of Public Radio Arizona, who is affiliated with Arizona Public Radio and Spot 127, had previously returned a $10,600 donation from Sinema after they discovered the source of the money.

“We respect Spot 127’s decision,” said Macey Matthews, a spokeswoman for Sinema, in a statement.

Other politicians and political committees in Arizona and New Mexico are doing similar moves to get rid of money people affiliated to Backpage.com had given to their campaigns.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. Prostitution will always be there. This is good that the money will be used to help those who most suffer from it. Problem is, it makes those who profit from it look good, which we don’t want, and it helps perpetuate a society in which prostitution flourishes. Lawmakers should be focused on ending the factors that cause people to prostitute themselves.

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