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Arizona governor gives raises to aides despite lean budget

Teachers rallied at the Arizona Capitol on May 2, 2017, after Rep. John Allen said teachers got second jobs to increase their lifestyle and buy boats. Teachers chanted that they wanted a 4 percent raise from the state. (Photo by Rachel Leingang, Arizona Capitol Times)

Teachers rallied at the Arizona Capitol on May 2, 2017, after Rep. John Allen said teachers got second jobs to increase their lifestyle and buy boats. Teachers chanted that they wanted a 4 percent raise from the state. (Photo by Rachel Leingang, Arizona Capitol Times)

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey has given 44 of his staffers raises of up to 20 percent despite offering teachers raises of less than 1 percent because of a lean budget.

The Arizona Republic reports that records the newspaper obtained indicate the Republican governor gave the majority of his staff a raise, a promotion or both since he took office in 2015.

Ducey’s spokesman says the raises to aides went to individuals “who have really proven themselves and done good work.”

The governor has also promoted at least 40 employees and their salary increases ranged from 5 to 100 percent.

Ducey has given raises and bonuses to a number of political appointees as well. The average raise given to 28 agency directors and deputy directors was a little over 10 percent.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. It’s about priorities. Teachers don’t matter because well-off people like Ducey can always put their kids in private schools. We have teacher shortage, but that’s okay because the people who lose education are, in the new Republican society, destined to be a lower class that doesn’t really need an education anyway. On the other hand, Ducey has to work with his staff, and if they make more money then he has a happier work environment and doesn’t have to look directly at underpaid workers.

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