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Author Archives: David Miller, Arizona Capitol Times correspondent

‘Spice’ no safe marijuana alternative

The toxic substance is widely available in smoke shops and liquor stores, as well as in wide supply on the Internet, advertised as “state legal.” Along with that description, companies promoting Spice should add “unsafe” and “potentially lethal” on the packaging.

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Construction mogul extends reach beyond industry (access required)

Family is the only thing that really pulls J. Doug Pruitt away from running a 120-year-old construction company. He freely admits his “vacations” are often off-time jaunts during business trips. His tireless demeanor has earned him much respect and even greater influence in and outside of the construction industry.

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Notable Arizona (access required)

Alberto Rios has always shared a connection with the history — both cultural and geographic — of Arizona. Born and raised here, the writer often presents images of the alternatively lush and barren landscape of the Grand Canyon State.

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Rocky campaigns (access required)

The candidates hoping to become Arizona’s next mine inspector agree that mining safety for workers and the public needs to be increased. How to accomplish that goal, just like everything else between the candidates, is a matter of debate.

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Soaring over solar? (access required)

In Arizona, power generated by the sun is the darling of many renewable-energy advocates, solar-power based companies and the governor. There is, however, another less cost-intensive player trying to gain a foothold in the renewable power game: wind.

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A lawyer walks into a Bar… (access required)

Alan Bayham gets paid to argue, so it’s no surprise that he speaks passionately and convincingly about his goals as the incoming president of the State Bar of Arizona — just don’t mention that other staple of the legal profession, lawyer jokes.

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A ‘necessary evil’ (access required)

A combination of fear and the state’s dire financial straits has pushed long-battling parties in a Maricopa County lawsuit into a tenuous agreement allowing the state to drastically reduce funding for mental health services and eliminate the office that ensures the lawsuit provisions are met.

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