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Author Archives: Jane Eppinga

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A Tucson Civic Leader

A Tucson Civic Leader

Merrill Freeman was a pioneer Arizonan active in territorial politics and education. But his route to Arizona was circuitous, and he didn’t arrive in Tucson until he was well into middle age.

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Southern Arizona’s Many Noons

Southern Arizona’s Many Noons

Dr. Adolphus H. Noon arrived in Tucson in October 1879, with his oldest son Alonzo and a friend. Noon was looking for a place to settle, where he could set up a medical practice and also do some mining.

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Tombstone’s Bird Cage Theater

Tombstone’s Bird Cage Theater

Tombstone’s most celebrated theater was the Bird Cage. In its heyday between 1881 and 1889, the theater offered gambling, liquor, vaudeville entertainment and ladies of the night. In 1882, ~The New York Times~ referred to the Bird Cage as “the Roughest, Bawdiest and Most Wicked Night Spot between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast.”

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The Flying Schoolgirl (access required)

The Flying Schoolgirl <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Katherine Stinson was born Feb. 14, 1896, in Jackson, Miss. As a young woman, she hoped to become a piano teacher and planned to study music in Europe, but lacked the money for the trip. For some reason, she fixed on becoming a stunt pilot as a quick way to earn cash. However, to pay the $500 cost of flying lessons, her family had to sell the piano. That might have been a hardship for Stinson, except that it turned out she liked flying so much she abandoned her music career for aviation.

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Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels (access required)

Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels, a schoolteacher and Pima County superintendent of schools, was born in a log cabin on a farm near Windsor, Randolph County, Ind., on Oct. 3, 1869. Her parents were Henry Harrison and Louisa Cropper Stakebake.

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The ‘Bisbee Review’ Train (access required)

The ‘Bisbee Review’ Train <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Shortly after midnight on Nov. 9, the Bisbee Review train pushed into the local station. Using results supplied by The Associated Press, the newspaper began to print its election special sections on two presses that ran until 3:45 a.m., as fast as possible. As soon as the election sections were printed, they were hauled off to the train.

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Arizona’s ‘Billy the Kid’

Arizona’s ‘Billy the Kid’

William Floyd Claiborne, called Billy the Kid (not to be confused with the original “Billy the Kid” whose given name was William H. Bonney), was born in Mississippi on Oct. 21, 1860. He came to Arizona in the early 1880s and worked as an amalgamator at mines in Charleston (a town a few miles southwest of Tombstone) and at the Neptune smelter in Hereford. Claiborne eventually fell in with a group of heavy-drinking cowboys and became friends with Tombstone’s infamous Clantons and McLaurys. He was a hothead.

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