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Author Archives: Jane Eppinga

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The Flying Schoolgirl (access required)

The Flying Schoolgirl <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Katherine Stinson was born Feb. 14, 1896, in Jackson, Miss. As a young woman, she hoped to become a piano teacher and planned to study music in Europe, but lacked the money for the trip. For some reason, she fixed on becoming a stunt pilot as a quick way to earn cash. However, to pay the $500 cost of flying lessons, her family had to sell the piano. That might have been a hardship for Stinson, except that it turned out she liked flying so much she abandoned her music career for aviation.

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Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels (access required)

Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels, a schoolteacher and Pima County superintendent of schools, was born in a log cabin on a farm near Windsor, Randolph County, Ind., on Oct. 3, 1869. Her parents were Henry Harrison and Louisa Cropper Stakebake.

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The ‘Bisbee Review’ Train (access required)

The ‘Bisbee Review’ Train <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Shortly after midnight on Nov. 9, the Bisbee Review train pushed into the local station. Using results supplied by The Associated Press, the newspaper began to print its election special sections on two presses that ran until 3:45 a.m., as fast as possible. As soon as the election sections were printed, they were hauled off to the train.

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Arizona’s ‘Billy the Kid’

Arizona’s ‘Billy the Kid’

William Floyd Claiborne, called Billy the Kid (not to be confused with the original “Billy the Kid” whose given name was William H. Bonney), was born in Mississippi on Oct. 21, 1860. He came to Arizona in the early 1880s and worked as an amalgamator at mines in Charleston (a town a few miles southwest of Tombstone) and at the Neptune smelter in Hereford. Claiborne eventually fell in with a group of heavy-drinking cowboys and became friends with Tombstone’s infamous Clantons and McLaurys. He was a hothead.

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Tombstone’s Chinese Pioneers (access required)

Tombstone’s Chinese Pioneers <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

In the late 19th century, about 400 Asians resided in Tombstone and were ruled by a Chinese woman named China Mary. She was known for wearing opulent brocades and expensive jewelry, and was considered one of Tombstone’s most influential Chinese residents. China Mary, whose Chinese name was apparently Sing Choy, had acquired enough money to buy a Tombstone property on block 2, lot 9. She also was the wife of Ah Lum, a partner with Quong Kee in the town’s famous Can-Can Restaurant.

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A case of territorial voter fraud

Robert Paul was born in Massachusetts on June 12, 1830. At the age of 12, he boarded a whaling ship and spent the next several years traveling around the world. In 1849, he arrived in San Francisco — just in time to participate in the gold rush. Then from 1859 to 1864, he served as sheriff of California’s Calaveras County. After several financial setbacks, Paul began riding shotgun for Wells Fargo.

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Manuelito (access required)

Manuelito <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

In the mid 1800s, Manuelito led the Navajos in some of the fiercest battles of the Indian wars with the U.S. He was born near Bear’s Ear in Utah and belonged to the Bit’ahni clan.

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