Quantcast
Home / Author Archives: Jane Eppinga (page 4)

Author Archives: Jane Eppinga

Feed Subscription

Alexander J. Chandler (access required)

Shortly after arriving in Arizona Territory from Detroit in 1887, Alexander J. Chandler was appointed territory veterinary surgeon as a part of the newly created Territorial Livestock Sanitary Commission by Gov. C. Meyer Zulick.

Read More »

Tombstone’s Sad Clown Legacy (access required)

For the Kelly family, clowning around was the only way to live. Three successive generations of Emmett Kellys would try to play the lucrative character of “Weary Willie,” a sad-faced hobo who would eventually become one of world’s most famous clowns.

Read More »

The Battle of Ambos Nogales (access required)

On the afternoon of Aug. 27, 1918, a Mexican civilian sparked a small gun battle after crossing from the United States back into Mexico at Nogales, without stopping at the U.S. Customs house. Customs Inspector Arthur G. Barber drew his pistol and chased the man, who was suspected of gun smuggling, followed by two enlisted men. A Mexican officer saw Barber coming across and fired at the customs inspector. The shot missed Barber, but struck and killed one of the other two troops. The remaining troop returned fire, killing the Mexican officer.

Read More »

The Dons and Doñas (access required)

Barry Goldwater, Carl Hayden and Ernest McFarland were members. So was President Harry S. Truman. Members of this group, the “Dons of Arizona,” are dedicated to exploring and preserving the history, legends and lore of Arizona and the Southwest.

Read More »

Postcard King of the West (access required)

Perhaps it was fate that Burton Frasher, who would eventually be eulogized as the “Postcard King of the West,” was born in 1888 — the very same year that George Eastman coined the word “Kodak” and the slogan “Kodak as you go” for his new mass market camera.

Read More »

Marvel Crosson and the Powder Puff Derby (access required)

Women had been flying airplanes since the early days of aviation, and by 1928, they had also piloted balloons, parachuted out of disabled planes, served as their own mechanics, set altitude and speed records, wing-walked and barnstormed. But they hadn't yet raced airplanes.

Read More »

A legendary Tombstone cowboy (access required)

On the silver screen and the wide-open southern Arizona ranges, Sid Wilson was one of the last authentic 19th century cowboys. His genuine, hard-working, real cowboy lifestyle provided authenticity to the characters he played in Hollywood movies and Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show.

Read More »

Bird Man of Tombstone (access required)

Some of Tombstone's most famous gun fighters, including the Earps, Doc Holliday, Billy Claiborne and Johnny Ringo all patronized Hafford Saloon, which became one of the most popular watering holes in Tombstone. But the establishment is notable for another reason entirely.

Read More »
Scroll To Top