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Author Archives: Jim Turner

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Global Influence (access required)

“It says here Aunt Susie died,” said George Smalley, reading a letter from home at the family dinner table. “Oh, who shot her?” asked his daughter Yndia. It seemed like everyone died that way in Globe in those days.

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Times Past: The ‘Mother of Arizona’ (access required)

Gov. George W. P. Hunt called Josephine Brawley Hughes “the Mother of Arizona.” She fought for women’s suffrage and prohibition of drinking and gambling. She even fought to ban smoking in public. In Arizona’s rowdy territorial days she was often laughed at, but she prevailed courageously.

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Geronimo’s Autobiography (access required)

In his autobiography, Geronimo told about the lifestyle and beliefs of his people, the Bedonkohe, who lived in the mountains along the eastern border of Arizona. He said he was born in 1829 near the headwaters of the Gila River.

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3 generations of photographers in the Old Pueblo (access required)

Arriving in Tucson seven years before the railroad, frontier photographer Henry Buehman captured the rapidly vanishing frontier on film. His son Albert Buehman continued the family tradition and gained international renown. Grandson Remick rounded out an 80-year family legacy.

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The Globe flood of 1904 (access required)

The rain began as a gentle shower. An hour later, six people were drowned and the damages amounted to half-a-million dollars. They called it the Globe flood, but the official government name was the Pinal Creek Flood, since it was the creek that did the flooding, not the town.

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Harry Truman and the Springerville Madonna (access required)

The Springerville "Madonna of the Trail" looms 18 feet high across from the Post Office on Main Street, also known as Highway 60. She has 11 identical sisters, each in a different state: Bethesda, Md.; Beallsville, Pa.; Springfield, Ohio; Wheeling, W.Va.; Vandalia, Ill.; Richmond, Ind.; Lexington, Miss.; Council Grove, Kan.; Lamar, Colo.; Albuquerque, N.M. and Upland, Calif.

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Arizona’s glittering silver inkwell (access required)

Colonel Charles D. Poston, self-named "Father of Arizona," commissioned the opulent treasure while serving as Arizona Territory's first delegate to Congress. He presented it to the president in March 1865, as a gift of appreciation for splitting New Mexico Territory in half to create Arizona in 1863.

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Mine with the iron door (access required)

"Look for the mine with the iron door, Jimmy," my dad said. When I was about six years old, Dad told me the legend of the lost mine and the Spanish missionaries who mined silver and gold on the north side of the Catalina Mountains. We'd leave Tucson in the dark to hunt quail on Golder Ranch, Owl's Head, or Tecolote northwest of town....

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The Great Arizona Outback (access required)

The Great Arizona Outback, also known as McMullen Valley, is a little-known locale where the frontier never closed. Hope, Salome, Wenden and Vicksburg are a few of the necklace of towns strung out along a desolate stretch of Highway 60 west of Phoenix. The valley was named after James McMullen, who ran the stage between Congress and Ehrenberg. Wells Fargo took over later and made it part of their Butterfield Stage Line.

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