Quantcast
Home / Author Archives: Mike Miller (page 2)

Author Archives: Mike Miller

Feed Subscription

The prowl of the ‘Velvet Tigress’ (access required)

Leading up to Halloween in 1939, Phoenix was enthralled with the first of several escapes by a female prisoner newspapers delighted in describing as the "Trunk Murderess," "Tiger Woman," "Blond Tigress," "Velvet Tigress" and "Mad Killer."

Read More »

City-county building (access required)

At the end of October of 1929, a $1.5 million (approximately $18.7 million today) structure, described as "...an inspiration for better government and a symbol of progress and prosperity," was dedicated at Central Avenue and Washington Street in downtown Phoenix.

Read More »

Arizona life circa 1907 (access required)

In 1907, the territory of Arizona had fewer than 200,000 residents. However, there seemed to be a number of interesting characters that kept the local newspapers busy. In Tucson, "...a jury of 12 good citizens" decided that cowboys and miners coming into town had two hours to remove their weapons.

Read More »

Phoenix baseball hit crossroads in 1950s (access required)

In the mid-1950s, the future of baseball in Phoenix seemed to be on the line as the city was trying to purchase Phoenix Municipal Stadium. Allerton Cushman and his wife owned approximately 10 acres around what was then called Phoenix Municipal Stadium at Third and Mohave streets south of downtown Phoenix. The 100 Club owned the Phoenix Senators that played at the stadium.

Read More »

The short-lived Papago Saguaro National Monument (access required)

Shortly after statehood in 1912, the Phoenix and Maricopa County Board of Trade began an effort to have what is now Papago Park declared either a national park or a national monument. Originally, the committee recommended the creation of a "National Cactus Park" just like Yellowstone National Park, the Yosemite National Park and the Mount Rainer National Park."

Read More »

Admission Day (access required)

Admission Day is a nearly forgotten day in the history of Arizona. Sept. 26, 1864, was the date "men, by organizing and beginning work, brought American government to the newest unit of America."

Read More »

Water: Feast and famine in early Phoenix (access required)

Irrigation helped make Phoenix an attractive place to live for many of the pioneers who were heading west to California in the 1800s. Mrs. Columbus Gray started toward California with her husband in 1868 in a wagon train from Arkansas.

Read More »

John C. Frémont (access required)

People have always come to Arizona for a new beginning or to reinvent themselves. John C. Frémont, "The Great Pathfinder," was no exception.

Read More »
Scroll To Top