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Author Archives: W. Lane Rogers

Page, Arizona

Page’s first school and its first faculty members.

In contrast to the typical image of a little red schoolhouse, this one-room school in Page, Arizona, in 1957 was a war surplus troop carrier. (The troop carriers were called “cattle cars” and were pulled by trailer trucks during World War II.) The older woman standing in the doorway is Mary Howe.

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Transitioning Tucson (access required)

Tucson in the early 1880s was changing from an old-world Spanish-Mexican village to a typical American town.

Looking northeast toward the barely visible Santa Catalina Mountains is Tucson in the early 1880s. The photograph, probably taken from the lower steps of Sentinel Peak, shows an evolving Tucson.

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Morenci: 1903 Strike (access required)

Soldiers in tents outside the Phelps Dodge Mercantile store were stationed in Morenci to control the mining strike of 1903.

The store pictured here was constructed at Morenci in 1901 by the Detroit Copper Company and known as the DC Store. Its rear wall and basement were fashioned from limestone and the balance of the structure was built with red granite quarried from nearby Morenci Canyon.

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‘Edward Jackson’ (access required)

Edward Jackson, in Willcox about 1920.

Little is known of Jackson’s early life. He claimed to have been born in Denver in 1877, but may have been born in San Antonio in 1878. He volunteered for military duty during the Spanish-American War, served in Manila in 1898 and — like many of his contemporaries — returned home with dysentery that would reoccur throughout his life.

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Gossip about the Pimas (access required)

Inscribed “Pima Buck,” this meticulously posed photograph of a young Pima man was taken in 1894, probably in a Tucson studio. While inherently demeaning, the photo was indicative of the “noble savage” motif then popular among Easterners and others.

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Will C. Barnes (access required)

Will Croft Barnes is best remembered for his concluding opus, “Arizona Place Names,” a book published in 1935, preceding his death a few months later. The book is still in print, which is a testament to its enduring value to both readers and scholars.

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Rations Day at San Carlos (access required)

With little else to look forward to, rations day on the San Carlos Apache Reservation was an event. As evidenced by this photo, taken about 1895, men, women and children, on horseback, muleback, and accompanied by their dogs, converged on agency headquarters to receive their weekly allotment.

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