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Home / Author Archives: W. Lane Rogers (page 2)

Author Archives: W. Lane Rogers

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McKinley’s visit to Congress (access required)

At first glance, the portly gentleman with hands clasped behind his back might be taken for an aging schoolmaster scolding errant children at recess. But he was not an educator and the youngsters pictured here were on their best behavior. They were, after all, hobnobbing with a man named William McKinley who was president of the United States.

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Old Main: No Running on the Balcony (access required)

During the first session of the Arizona Territorial Legislature in 1864 — when not a single public school existed in the newly formed territory — lawmakers authorized a university and wrote a constitution to guide its affairs.

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Gilmore and Salisbury’s ‘custom’ smelter (access required)

Benson was established in June 1880 by the Southern Pacific and became an important maintenance center for the railroad and the shipping point for the Bisbee and Tombstone mines, neither of which was served by rail. The town was less than three months old when, according to the Tucson Citizen, “the first shipment of copper bullion from Bisbee (arrived) in Benson, where it (was) shipped to San Francisco.” It was transported to Benson by mule-drawn wagons, weighing 43,003 pounds.

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The ‘Convento’ (access required)

South of Congress Street on the west side of the Santa Cruz River near downtown Tucson was a Pima Indian village. This site, at the base of Sentinel Peak — today it is called ‘A’ Mountain — is known to have been inhabited since at least 1000 B.C. Located by a once-flowing spring that emptied into the Santa Cruz, American Indians called the village Stjukson (spelling of the word varies widely; the Spanish transliterated it to Tucson).

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Alianza Hispano-Americana (access required)

During the mid to late 19th century, Mexicans and Anglos were living side-by-side in many cities and towns throughout the Southwest. In Tucson, the first Anglos settled during the 1850s. They enjoyed a close association with their Hispanic neighbors, both socially and in business, and intermarriage was more common than not. During the 1870s, as the Anglo population rapidly increased, racial tension — especially among the labor classes — developed.

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Paradise, Arizona (access required)

In 1940, the year this photograph was taken, an unidentified scribe noted "a score of weather-worn frame buildings scattered along the narrow, winding mountain road" that snakes through Paradise.

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Never mind Mining (access required)

This 1956 photo of Tombstone shows a modern, but economically depressed town. It wasn't until Hollywood painted a fantastic picture of the Wild West did the town cash in its rough-and-tumble lore with tourists.

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