Quantcast
Home / Author Archives: W. Lane Rogers (page 2)

Author Archives: W. Lane Rogers

Feed Subscription

The ‘Convento’ (access required)

South of Congress Street on the west side of the Santa Cruz River near downtown Tucson was a Pima Indian village. This site, at the base of Sentinel Peak — today it is called ‘A’ Mountain — is known to have been inhabited since at least 1000 B.C. Located by a once-flowing spring that emptied into the Santa Cruz, American Indians called the village Stjukson (spelling of the word varies widely; the Spanish transliterated it to Tucson).

Read More »

Alianza Hispano-Americana (access required)

During the mid to late 19th century, Mexicans and Anglos were living side-by-side in many cities and towns throughout the Southwest. In Tucson, the first Anglos settled during the 1850s. They enjoyed a close association with their Hispanic neighbors, both socially and in business, and intermarriage was more common than not. During the 1870s, as the Anglo population rapidly increased, racial tension — especially among the labor classes — developed.

Read More »

Paradise, Arizona (access required)

In 1940, the year this photograph was taken, an unidentified scribe noted "a score of weather-worn frame buildings scattered along the narrow, winding mountain road" that snakes through Paradise.

Read More »

Never mind Mining (access required)

This 1956 photo of Tombstone shows a modern, but economically depressed town. It wasn't until Hollywood painted a fantastic picture of the Wild West did the town cash in its rough-and-tumble lore with tourists.

Read More »

A legendary craftsman (access required)

In 1919, El Tucsonense, Arizona's largest Spanish language newspaper, hailed Federico Ronstadt as "one of the most prominent figures in the higher commercial circles of Tucson." The writer did not exaggerate.

Read More »

San Antonio Ranch (access required)

One of Arizona's oldest and most enduring families, the Sosas trace their genesis to Jecori, a village on the banks of the Yaqui River between Cumpas and Oposura, Sonora. There, in 1746, Jose Maria Sosa was born.

Read More »

Trading at Cameron (access required)

Constructed over the Little Colorado River in 1911, this uniquely designed sway-back suspension bridge offered ease of egress/ingress to the western lip of the vast Navajo Nation, 54 miles north of Flagstaff.

Read More »
Scroll To Top