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Frank Holme at the Schorgl Ranch (access required)

The Schorgl Ranch was one of a number of camps for tuberculars (commonly called “lungers’ camps”) built in the Arizona desert around the turn of the century. Because tuberculosis was highly contagious, healthy people feared infection and segregated the invalids on the outskirts of town. The tuberculars lived in tents because it was cheap, and they couldn’t afford medical care in the local sanatoriums and hospitals. Also, it was believed that fresh air was therapeutic and helped in the cure.

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Escaping from the Phoenix Indian School (access required)

Anglos moving into the Arizona Territory during the late 1800s believed that the Native Americans already there should be acclimated into Anglo culture. During that time, Indian boarding schools were built and native children were removed from their homes and placed into these schools. For one Hopi, however, going to the Phoenix Indian School was a choice he made reluctantly out of respect for his grandfather and because he believed he would find a book full of knowledge. But he didn’t stay long.

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Phoenix Streetcars (access required)

In the late 19th century, just about every city of any size had a streetcar or trolley line. In Phoenix, there was the Phoenix Street Railway System, which operated from 1887 to 1948. It was owned and operated by the great promoter and subdivision mogul, Moses H. Sherman, until 1925, when the city of Phoenix took over operations.

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Bisbee’s mighty tug of war (access required)

In December 1903, handbills began appearing around Bisbee announcing a mighty tug-of-war competition. Tug-of-war was popular in the early 1900s, particularly in the rough and ready mining towns of the West, where a man’s strength and brawn was a measure of his success.

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Percival Lowell: Stargazer (access required)

The man at the eyepiece of the telescope is Percival Lowell, early day astronomer and founder of Flagstaff’s Lowell Observatory. He spent the better part of a lifetime probing the solar system — gazing into the lens of this Clark 24-inch refractor telescope (now a registered national historic landmark) from atop Mars Hill in Flagstaff.

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Kaibab Plateau – The Waterless Mountain (access required)

The road from Jacob Lake to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is a lovely journey through grassy parks surrounded by spruce and fir trees at a an altitude of more than 8,000 feet. The pleasant coolness refreshes after travelling through the beautiful, yet harsh, high desert of the Vermillion Cliffs and House Rock Valley. The lack of streams and lakes on the plateau has limited human settlement there, yet there is enough snowfall to allow trees and grasses to thrive.

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