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Queen of the Colorado (access required)

This Mohave was the largest and most palatial of the paddle-wheelers on the Colorado River a century ago. The photo was taken in 1876, when the Mohave was docked at Yuma taking on school children for a May Day excursion. The ship had been launched earlier that year, replacing a smaller boat (also called the Mohave) that had been dismantled and completely rebuilt.

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Toll gate, McDowell at Central (access required)

The toll road — Central Ave. (then called Center Street) north of McDowell — was built by the Central Avenue Driving Association. It was a dirt road, eight miles long and 100 feet wide, with a row of olive and ash trees on either side. Property owners north of the gate paid $2.50 a month for sprinkling and improvements. Buggies and wagons paid a 25 cent toll. Bicycles were free.

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Bisbee’s Miners and Merchants Bank (access required)

The Miners and Merchants Bank on Bisbee’s Main Street incorporated on June 12, 1900, with a capitalization of $50,000. Founding directors were Bisbee merchants L.C. Shattuck, Joseph Muheim, L.J. Overlock, Jakob Schmidt and J.T. Hood.

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The Best of All Games (access required)

This is Willie Marshall, Warren Country Club’s first golf pro, hitting a fairway shot in 1910. Over his right shoulder, in the distance, is the Warren/Bisbee Trolley. The trolley provided transportation to the golf course, which was located just south of Warren, Ariz.,within sight of the Mexican border.

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Old Main: No Running on the Balcony (access required)

During the first session of the Arizona Territorial Legislature in 1864 — when not a single public school existed in the newly formed territory — lawmakers authorized a university and wrote a constitution to guide its affairs.

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Building the Kaibab Bridge, 1921 (access required)

The Kaibab suspension bridge over the Colorado River was to link Bright Angel Trail on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon with the Kaibab Trail on the North Rim. At the time, the only means of crossing the river between the two trails was by small canvas boat. (The closest ferry crossings were at Lee’s Ferry, upstream near the Utah border and downstream at Needles on the California border.) Construction began in January 1921.

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