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Tucson’s nymphs de pave (access required)

Maiden Lane bordered Congress Street, and between the two was a stretch of “unholy” land shaped like a thin slice of pie and called the wedge — pictured here in the accompanying turn-of-the-century photo. The red light district was anything but invisible.

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Tombstone’s Boothill Cemetery (access required)

The Boothill Cemetery, which was laid out in 1878 on a rocky hillside facing the Dragoon Mountains, earned the name for a reason. If a body was buried not wearing boots, it meant the person died of natural causes. If the body was buried wearing boots, it meant the person was killed.

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Alexander J. Chandler (access required)

Shortly after arriving in Arizona Territory from Detroit in 1887, Alexander J. Chandler was appointed territory veterinary surgeon as a part of the newly created Territorial Livestock Sanitary Commission by Gov. C. Meyer Zulick.

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The Farm that Founded Scottsdale (access required)

On July 2, 1888, U.S. Army Chaplain Winfield Scott directed an agent in Tucson to file a claim and make an initial down payment of 50 cents an acre on 640 acres of land just below the Arizona Canal near the intersection of present-day Indian School and Scottsdale roads.

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Clifton Mineral Hot Springs

Clifton is situated in a deep canyon formed by the San Francisco River. The town is synonymous in Arizona vocabulary with its twin neighbor Morenci and the rich copper deposits responsible for the existence of both.

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Times Past: Castle Hot Springs (access required)

The natural beauty and healing waters of Castle Hot Springs have enticed several owners during the years to attempt to craft the area into a successful resort destination, with varying degrees of success.

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A Thousand words (access required)

This photo, taken in the early 1930s, captures Phoenix near the end of a transition. The area in the foreground of the picture is now occupied by Chase Field. At the time the photo was taken, however, it was the ...

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Global Influence (access required)

“It says here Aunt Susie died,” said George Smalley, reading a letter from home at the family dinner table. “Oh, who shot her?” asked his daughter Yndia. It seemed like everyone died that way in Globe in those days.

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