Quantcast
Home / Times Past (page 16) /

Times Past

The Other Heroes of War (access required)

A young boy holds a rifle in Naco, Sonora, circa 1914. Many boys died in the Mexican Revolution probably without ever understanding the political significance of what they were doing.

The soldier heroes of war are immortalized in bronze and stone, shouldering weapons, riding great steeds and urging their forces toward battle. Yet courage in war is not limited to male combatants. Women and children also act in bold and noble ways in war.

Read More »

The Valenzuelas of Phoenix (access required)

8-30-Times-past

On Sept. 15, 1918, a young soldier, who expected momentarily to be sent overseas to fight the Germans, had himself photographed at Camp (now Fort) Dix, New Jersey, and sent the result on a postcard addressed to Rosa Gold of Phoenix.

Read More »

Pythian Castle, Bisbee (access required)

The Knights of Pythias was one of a number of fraternal organizations founded in 19th Century America. (Others were the Grange, the Knights of Columbus, Order of Hibernians, and the Order of Elks. The Freemasons and Odd Fellows, two of the best-known groups, were founded in England in the 18th Century.) The Pythians were founded in Washington D.C. in 1864 by Justice H. Rathbone and five clerks. By 1900, there were almost 1 million members.

Read More »

Early LDS settlements in Arizona Territory (access required)

8-16-Times-Past

Hearty members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints (LDS) were summoned to leave their Utah homes and settle in Arizona Territory beginning in the 1860s as LDS President Brigham Young was concerned with westward-bound wagon trains filled with non-LDS settlers wanting to move into the wide open west.

Read More »

The ‘Bisbee Review’ Train (access required)

The train and crew carrying the Bisbee Review’s 1904 special election edition.

Shortly after midnight on Nov. 9, the Bisbee Review train pushed into the local station. Using results supplied by The Associated Press, the newspaper began to print its election special sections on two presses that ran until 3:45 a.m., as fast as possible. As soon as the election sections were printed, they were hauled off to the train.

Read More »

Arizona’s colorful territorial saloons (access required)

Whiskey the Road to Ruin Saloon in Gila Bend.

What would a Western movie be without the familiar saloon fight, the hard drinking customers, the cardsharp trying to cheat patrons out of their hard-earned cash, or the dancing girl hanging on the arm of a lonely miner? Who can forget the steely-eyed Virgil Earp playing an all-night card game with Johnny Behan, Ike Clanton and Tom McLaury in Tombstone’s Occidental Saloon the evening before the shootout at the OK Corral?

Read More »

First automobile trip to the Grand Canyon

Indispensable horses rescue a vehicle in northern Arizona.

First automobile trip to the Grand Canyon People eager to see the Grand Canyon’s South Rim in 1901 traveled however they could — by foot, wagon, horse, a rollicking stage ride and railroad. Just four months after the train arrived at the South Rim, the first automobile departed Flagstaff on Saturday afternoon Jan. 4, 1902, with many townspeople present to watch, cheer and jeer.

Read More »

Arizona’s ‘Billy the Kid’

William Floyd Claiborne, age 22, was shot to death in the streets of Tombstone on Nov. 14, 1882.

William Floyd Claiborne, called Billy the Kid (not to be confused with the original “Billy the Kid” whose given name was William H. Bonney), was born in Mississippi on Oct. 21, 1860. He came to Arizona in the early 1880s and worked as an amalgamator at mines in Charleston (a town a few miles southwest of Tombstone) and at the Neptune smelter in Hereford. Claiborne eventually fell in with a group of heavy-drinking cowboys and became friends with Tombstone’s infamous Clantons and McLaurys. He was a hothead.

Read More »