Quantcast
Home / Times Past (page 17)

Times Past

Feed Subscription

Times Past: The ‘Mother of Arizona’ (access required)

Gov. George W. P. Hunt called Josephine Brawley Hughes “the Mother of Arizona.” She fought for women’s suffrage and prohibition of drinking and gambling. She even fought to ban smoking in public. In Arizona’s rowdy territorial days she was often laughed at, but she prevailed courageously.

Read More »

Times Past: Light’s Golden Jubilee (access required)

More than 7,000 Arizona residents celebrated “Light’s Golden Jubilee” in downtown Phoenix on Oct. 21, 1929. The more than five-hour celebration was considered “the greatest honor ever accorded an inventor during his lifetime.”

Read More »

Times Past: Bob Burgunder, student murderer (access required)

As former Arizona State Teachers College student Bob Burgunder, Jr., sat on death row in Florence, he commented, “There’s too much free speech in this country. I think there’s too much education, too. I think we should stop educating the masses and educate only a few intelligent people.”

Read More »

Brief rise and fall of the Arizona Cattle Company (access required)

Hidden behind buildings and a school playground along busy Highway 180 in Flagstaff is one of the few remaining historic barns in Arizona. If the walls could talk, they would tell of the ranching life in the 1880s and the quick rise and fall of its probable builders, the Arizona Cattle Company.

Read More »

The Battle of Ambos Nogales (access required)

On the afternoon of Aug. 27, 1918, a Mexican civilian sparked a small gun battle after crossing from the United States back into Mexico at Nogales, without stopping at the U.S. Customs house. Customs Inspector Arthur G. Barber drew his pistol and chased the man, who was suspected of gun smuggling, followed by two enlisted men. A Mexican officer saw Barber coming across and fired at the customs inspector. The shot missed Barber, but struck and killed one of the other two troops. The remaining troop returned fire, killing the Mexican officer.

Read More »

Spirit of the Biltmore (access required)

Charles McArthur, Warren McArthur, Jr. and Albert McArthur dreamed about and ultimately built a resort "where the great men and women of the earth would come and rest and play, where these visitors could live in luxury while they surveyed the unexcelled advantages of the Salt River Valley, and where investors in a hotel could realize satisfactory profits from their investments.

Read More »

Times Past: Mother Hanley

Margaret Murphy Hanley arrived in Flagstaff in the early 1900s with one goal in mind: To be able to offer her children, ages six to 16 at the time, higher education as a benefit of her employment with the Arizona State College. Through her four decades of work at the school, she would leave a legacy still visible today, but she wasn’t a teacher.

Read More »

Times Past: Hotel Westward Ho (access required)

At the gala celebration for the opening of the newly constructed, $2.5 million ($29.6 million when adjusted for inflation), Hotel Westward Ho, recently elected Gov. John C. Phillips was asked to speak. He said, "I am not a great man and I have never done great things. With your friendship and cooperation and the assistance of Divine Providence, however, I sincerely hope that I will make you a good governor."

Read More »

Geronimo’s Autobiography (access required)

In his autobiography, Geronimo told about the lifestyle and beliefs of his people, the Bedonkohe, who lived in the mountains along the eastern border of Arizona. He said he was born in 1829 near the headwaters of the Gila River.

Read More »
Scroll To Top