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Spirit of the Biltmore (access required)

Charles McArthur, Warren McArthur, Jr. and Albert McArthur dreamed about and ultimately built a resort "where the great men and women of the earth would come and rest and play, where these visitors could live in luxury while they surveyed the unexcelled advantages of the Salt River Valley, and where investors in a hotel could realize satisfactory profits from their investments.

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Times Past: Mother Hanley

Margaret Murphy Hanley arrived in Flagstaff in the early 1900s with one goal in mind: To be able to offer her children, ages six to 16 at the time, higher education as a benefit of her employment with the Arizona State College. Through her four decades of work at the school, she would leave a legacy still visible today, but she wasn’t a teacher.

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Times Past: Hotel Westward Ho (access required)

At the gala celebration for the opening of the newly constructed, $2.5 million ($29.6 million when adjusted for inflation), Hotel Westward Ho, recently elected Gov. John C. Phillips was asked to speak. He said, "I am not a great man and I have never done great things. With your friendship and cooperation and the assistance of Divine Providence, however, I sincerely hope that I will make you a good governor."

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Geronimo’s Autobiography (access required)

In his autobiography, Geronimo told about the lifestyle and beliefs of his people, the Bedonkohe, who lived in the mountains along the eastern border of Arizona. He said he was born in 1829 near the headwaters of the Gila River.

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Baseball in the Old Pueblo, c. 1908 (access required)

These are the members of Drachman’s Elysian Grove baseball team in Tucson. Standing left to right are Frank “Pancho” Navarro, Emanuel “Manny” Drachman (team captain and catcher), Herb Drachman, William Armstrong and Julian Montano. In the foreground are Julian Vargas, ...

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The Dons and Doñas (access required)

Barry Goldwater, Carl Hayden and Ernest McFarland were members. So was President Harry S. Truman. Members of this group, the “Dons of Arizona,” are dedicated to exploring and preserving the history, legends and lore of Arizona and the Southwest.

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Buffalo Bill comes to Phoenix

William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody was born near Davenport, Iowa, on Feb. 26, 1846. In 1860, at age 14, he joined the Pony Express which advertised for “expert riders willing to risk death daily.” During the Civil War, he served as a scout and enlisted soldier, and at age 21 was hired by the Kansas Pacific Railroad to hunt buffalo that would be used to feed construction crews. In 17 months, he claimed to have killed 4,280 buffaloes, garnering his nickname in the process.

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Alianza Hispano-Americana (access required)

During the mid to late 19th century, Mexicans and Anglos were living side-by-side in many cities and towns throughout the Southwest. In Tucson, the first Anglos settled during the 1850s. They enjoyed a close association with their Hispanic neighbors, both socially and in business, and intermarriage was more common than not. During the 1870s, as the Anglo population rapidly increased, racial tension — especially among the labor classes — developed.

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Postcard King of the West (access required)

Perhaps it was fate that Burton Frasher, who would eventually be eulogized as the “Postcard King of the West,” was born in 1888 — the very same year that George Eastman coined the word “Kodak” and the slogan “Kodak as you go” for his new mass market camera.

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