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Times Past: Castle Hot Springs (access required)

The natural beauty and healing waters of Castle Hot Springs have enticed several owners during the years to attempt to craft the area into a successful resort destination, with varying degrees of success.

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A Thousand words (access required)

This photo, taken in the early 1930s, captures Phoenix near the end of a transition. The area in the foreground of the picture is now occupied by Chase Field. At the time the photo was taken, however, it was the ...

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Global Influence (access required)

“It says here Aunt Susie died,” said George Smalley, reading a letter from home at the family dinner table. “Oh, who shot her?” asked his daughter Yndia. It seemed like everyone died that way in Globe in those days.

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Pioneer Days (access required)

For several decades, Arizonans held a grand, multi-day celebration of those who came to the territory before Dec. 31, 1890, called Pioneer Days.

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Tombstone’s Sad Clown Legacy (access required)

For the Kelly family, clowning around was the only way to live. Three successive generations of Emmett Kellys would try to play the lucrative character of “Weary Willie,” a sad-faced hobo who would eventually become one of world’s most famous clowns.

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Arizona’s cow-punchers

Arizona cowboys were often referred to as “cow-punchers,” with their styles of riding and dress made up from a mix of the traditions of Texas and California cowboys.

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Times Past: The ‘Mother of Arizona’ (access required)

Gov. George W. P. Hunt called Josephine Brawley Hughes “the Mother of Arizona.” She fought for women’s suffrage and prohibition of drinking and gambling. She even fought to ban smoking in public. In Arizona’s rowdy territorial days she was often laughed at, but she prevailed courageously.

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Times Past: Light’s Golden Jubilee (access required)

More than 7,000 Arizona residents celebrated “Light’s Golden Jubilee” in downtown Phoenix on Oct. 21, 1929. The more than five-hour celebration was considered “the greatest honor ever accorded an inventor during his lifetime.”

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