Quantcast
Home / Times Past (page 2) /

Times Past

The Constitutional Convention (access required)

tp-011317-web

In the second row near the center is the unmistakable hulk and balding pate of George W.P. Hunt, the convention president and the man who would become the state’s first and longest-serving governor. Directly behind Hunt in bow tie and fedora is Morris Goldwater. In the back row second from left is future Governor Sidney P. Osborn.

Read More »

Trinidad Swilling (access required)

tp-010217-web

Trinidad Escalantes Swilling Shumaker was born in Hermosillo, Sonora, of Spanish parents. Her father, a sea captain from Cadiz named Ignatius Escalantes, and his wife, Petra Mejia, were shipwrecked off the west coast of Mexico. They made their way to Hermosillo, where Trinidad was born in 1847. Ignatius died while Trinidad was a child, and eventually she and her mother joined a wagon train headed for a new life in Tucson.

Read More »

Pipe Springs (access required)

tp123016-web

The springs were in a remote area located north of the Grand Canyon on the Kaibab Plateau. Today that northwest corner of the state is known as the Arizona Strip and is accessible by paved road only through Utah.

Read More »

The Blevins Killing (access required)

tp-120916-620x330

He was born in Tennessee in 1852 and named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry who distinguished himself in the War of 1812. It is not known when or why Owens came West.

Read More »

Wyatt Earp (access required)

tp-112516-web

Although millions of words have been written about Wyatt Earp, precious little is known about the man behind the myth. Tombstone aficionados will argue endlessly about which side of the law he was on. But few have paid attention to or written about his life after the gunfight that made him famous.

Read More »

Fort Bowie, 1886 (access required)

tp-111816-web

Fort Bowie is linked in history with the Apache wars of the 1870s and ’80s. But it owes its existence to the Battle of Apache Pass in 1862 and the Confederate invasion of what was then New Mexico Territory.

Read More »

The Blizzard of 1916 (access required)

TimesPast-10-28-16

This is Main Street in Bisbee on January 21, 1916, the day after the biggest snowfall in city history. The storm began on January 19 with heavy winds that tore off roofs in the Warren District. The wind abated, the sky cleared briefly—then it began to rain. The streets soon ran like rivers. The sky cleared again in the afternoon, but by 5 p.m. snow began to fall, increasing throughout the night until by morning all of southern Arizona from Benson to the Mexican border was blanketed.

Read More »