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Arizona’s glittering silver inkwell (access required)

Colonel Charles D. Poston, self-named "Father of Arizona," commissioned the opulent treasure while serving as Arizona Territory's first delegate to Congress. He presented it to the president in March 1865, as a gift of appreciation for splitting New Mexico Territory in half to create Arizona in 1863.

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Mine with the iron door (access required)

"Look for the mine with the iron door, Jimmy," my dad said. When I was about six years old, Dad told me the legend of the lost mine and the Spanish missionaries who mined silver and gold on the north side of the Catalina Mountains. We'd leave Tucson in the dark to hunt quail on Golder Ranch, Owl's Head, or Tecolote northwest of town....

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Globe Masons (access required)

In 1879, six men met in Globe, Ariz., to discuss leaving their respective Masonic temples. Their first task was to figure out if enough of them were actually willing to dimit (a Masonic term used for a written certification of honorable withdrawal from membership) from their respective lodges to establish a new lodge of Free & Accepted Masons in the small town east of Mesa.

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Naming Arizona (access required)

The 1873 and 1876 migrations into Arizona Territory by the Church of Latter-day Saints (LDS) primarily followed the wildly fluctuating course of the Little Colorado River. Town sites initially established at river's edge were often washed out, which caused settlers to move to higher ground. The settlers usually located at sites that were already occupied by others, and today's names of these locations often reflect LDS heritage. Following is a brief history of the names of some of these areas.

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Never mind Mining (access required)

This 1956 photo of Tombstone shows a modern, but economically depressed town. It wasn't until Hollywood painted a fantastic picture of the Wild West did the town cash in its rough-and-tumble lore with tourists.

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Triangle L Ranch (access required)

Triangle L Ranch, one of the first dude ranches in southern Arizona, began in the 1890s as a working cattle ranch frequented by Buffalo Bill. The 49-acre property near the Catalina Mountains is now operated by Sharon Holnback as a bed-and-breakfast, farmers' market, art gallery and concert venue, but once had its share of horse opera drama.

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A legendary craftsman (access required)

In 1919, El Tucsonense, Arizona's largest Spanish language newspaper, hailed Federico Ronstadt as "one of the most prominent figures in the higher commercial circles of Tucson." The writer did not exaggerate.

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The Southern Arizona Auto Company (access required)

The Stevens-Duryea Company produced cars in Chicopee Falls, Mass., between 1901 and 1915 and from 1919 to 1927. The company’s first foray into the car business began with the introduction of a two-cylinder, five-horsepower runabout that sold for $1,200. The firm produced 61 cars in 1902 and 483 in 1903.

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