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Times Past

The Donofrio/Grosso Clan (access required)

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Theresa settled in Philadelphia with her husband Mike, who was also an immigrant and a miner in the Pennsylvania coal fields. Charles went to Phoenix, where he earned a living selling oranges for a nickel a piece on Washington Street. ...

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The Oriental Saloon (access required)

This is Tombstone’s Oriental Saloon, photographed in the 1930s after its conversion for use as a drug store.

Owned by Jim Vizina, its bar and restaurant rented to Cochise County Supervisor M.E. (Milt) Joyce, the Oriental was considered Tombstone’s finest saloon. “Last evening,” wrote the Tombstone Epitaph, about the opening in 1880, “the portals were thrown open and ...

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Martin Gold, Phoenix pioneer (access required)

These members of the Martin Gold family are standing in front of the first large steam engine and threshing machine in the Phoenix area. They are, from left, Martin Gold; his daughter, Rose; an unidentified farmhand; Gold’s daughter, Helen; Dave Martinez; an unidentified young woman; and Gold’s stepson, Ulysses Schofield. The photograph was taken during the harvest in July 1914. Gold brought the first steam thresher to Phoenix.

By all accounts, Martin Gold was a humble and hard-working man. He was popular among the immigrant community, especially the Mexicans—who called him Don Martin—because of his facility with languages.

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Immaculate Heart and the Divided Parish (access required)

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This is Immaculate Heart Church and the church school on East Washington Street in downtown Phoenix about the time the church was dedicated—December 15, 1928. It was a separate church for Phoenix’s Mexican-American and Mexican Catholics who had split from ...

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The Y Digs a Pool (access required)

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The Bisbee Review called the Bisbee YMCA “worthy of a metropolitan YMCA for proper care of the physical well being.” Club Secretary Richardson was especially proud of the bowling facilities, “…four ‘Daylight’ alleys patterned after regulation type and offering finest tournament equipment.

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Irrigators Take the Title (access required)

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Harry Westfall batted .493 that year. Affectionately known as ”Fat” for his hefty physique, he was an outstanding catcher who reputedly could throw a ball to second base on a line that never rose more than three feet off the ground—out of a crouch from home plate. Ray Stone went 8-2 in the regular season that year and pitched in both playoff games.

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Fairbank (access required)

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Fairbank came into existence in 1882, when tracks were laid for the New Mexico and Arizona Railroad, a short line that ran from Benson to Nogales.

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Prohibition—Cochise County Style (access required)

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When Cochise County Sheriff Harry Wheeler set about destroying illegal whiskey, he nearly stopped a trial in this building. He was working outside the Cochise County Courthouse in Tombstone, shown here in a photograph taken by C.S. Fly about 1890.

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