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Times Past

Teenage mercenary

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  Little is known about Laurence Brown – even his name is in question. He was an American and just 17 years old when he flew his bi-plane over the border and joined Calles’ Army to fight Pancho Villa in ...

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General Miles in Tucson (access required)

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Nelson Appleton Miles was born Aug. 6, 1839, at Westminster, Mass. On Sept. 9, 1861, at the age of 22, he was appointed a first lieutenant in the 22nd Massachusetts Infantry. He made a distinguished Civil War record and was ...

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Charles Poston, the father of Arizona (access required)

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The man at the right is Charles Debrille Poston, Arizona’s first delegate to Congress and the Father of Arizona, so designated in 1899 by the 20th Territorial Legislature. With him are Louis H. Chalmers (at left), House of Representatives, Maricopa ...

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Mohave County Officials – 1910 (access required)

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Here are a few facts we know about three of the men in this photograph, Henry Lovin, William Blakely and Walter Brown. Henry Lovin had a difficult early career, but found success finally in Mohave County. He was born in ...

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The Donofrio/Grosso Clan (access required)

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Theresa settled in Philadelphia with her husband Mike, who was also an immigrant and a miner in the Pennsylvania coal fields. Charles went to Phoenix, where he earned a living selling oranges for a nickel a piece on Washington Street. ...

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The Oriental Saloon (access required)

This is Tombstone’s Oriental Saloon, photographed in the 1930s after its conversion for use as a drug store.

Owned by Jim Vizina, its bar and restaurant rented to Cochise County Supervisor M.E. (Milt) Joyce, the Oriental was considered Tombstone’s finest saloon. “Last evening,” wrote the Tombstone Epitaph, about the opening in 1880, “the portals were thrown open and ...

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Martin Gold, Phoenix pioneer (access required)

These members of the Martin Gold family are standing in front of the first large steam engine and threshing machine in the Phoenix area. They are, from left, Martin Gold; his daughter, Rose; an unidentified farmhand; Gold’s daughter, Helen; Dave Martinez; an unidentified young woman; and Gold’s stepson, Ulysses Schofield. The photograph was taken during the harvest in July 1914. Gold brought the first steam thresher to Phoenix.

By all accounts, Martin Gold was a humble and hard-working man. He was popular among the immigrant community, especially the Mexicans—who called him Don Martin—because of his facility with languages.

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Immaculate Heart and the Divided Parish (access required)

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This is Immaculate Heart Church and the church school on East Washington Street in downtown Phoenix about the time the church was dedicated—December 15, 1928. It was a separate church for Phoenix’s Mexican-American and Mexican Catholics who had split from ...

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