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The Eight-Hour Day (access required)

Contingent of Arizona Rangers that eventually restored order at Clifton-Morenci. The Arizona Territorial 22nd Legislative Assembly passed an eight-hour law in 1903. The law required underground miners to work no more than eight hours a day. The miners had been ...

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Chloride, the ‘nation’s most important city’ (access required)

Predictions that Chloride would rival New York as the nation’s most important city were made with unblushing faces by enthusiastic boosters in 1899. That year, the Arizona-Utah Railroad completed a spur line that connected with the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa ...

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Judge Joseph Kibbey (access required)

Judge Joseph Kibbey in 1900. As Judge Joseph Kibbey lie in state on the Great Seal of Arizona under the Capitol Rotunda, he was eulogized by Judge Richard Sloan “…as the builder of states.” Sloan stated that Kibbey had three ...

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The Arizona Rangers (access required)

The Arizona Rangers scan for cattle rustlers from a hilltop. In March of 1901, the 21st Assembly of the Arizona Territorial Legislature authorized Gov. Nathan Murphy to form the Arizona Rangers. The Rangers only consisted of 14 men; a captain, ...

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Yuma Territorial Prison (access required)

Yuma Territorial Prison yard One of the storied institutions of the West is the Yuma Territorial Prison, seen here in a photograph thought to be taken during the latter days of the 19th century. Built by inmate labor, the prison ...

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Sierra Vista (access required)

In 1877, Fort Huachuca was established at the cradle of the Huachuca Mountains in southeastern Arizona Territory. Its mission was to protect settlers from Apache attacks and secure the United States border with Mexico. However, its rugged isolation did not ...

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Benson City Hall (access required)

Benson City Hall in the 1950s This seemingly innocuous building was for many years a thorn in the collective backside of Benson’s political mucky-mucks. Built in 1936 to house city hall and the police and fire departments, it was constructed ...

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Lowell Observatory (access required)

Percival Lowell records his findings in the late 1890s in his Flagstaff observatory. As a youngster, Percival Lowell read books about astronomy and gazed at the stars through a telescope fixed atop the roof of his family home. No one ...

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The Bisbee Deportation (access required)

More than 1,000 strikers were taken at gunpoint to the Warren baseball field. During the early years of the 20th century, labor unrest was rampant across the nation. In 1917 alone, more than 4,200 strikes erupted in the United States. ...

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