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Times Past

Wanted: 10 Explorers! (access required)

During the summer of 1933, a scientific reconnaissance project, "Rainbow Bridge/Monument Valley Expedition" (RBMVE) began in the remote reaches of northeastern Arizona. The idea was conceived by Ansel Franklin Hall of the National Park Service, following a suggestion by U.S. Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes.

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Admission Day (access required)

Admission Day is a nearly forgotten day in the history of Arizona. Sept. 26, 1864, was the date "men, by organizing and beginning work, brought American government to the newest unit of America."

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The Globe flood of 1904 (access required)

The rain began as a gentle shower. An hour later, six people were drowned and the damages amounted to half-a-million dollars. They called it the Globe flood, but the official government name was the Pinal Creek Flood, since it was the creek that did the flooding, not the town.

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A century of weather (access required)

Early U.S. Forest Service (USFS) scientists assigned to study the northern Arizona forests realized the importance of climate when it comes to the life of trees. One of the first tasks researchers undertook was to establish weather-recording equipment at the nation's first USFS forest research site at Fort Valley, near Flagstaff.

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Harry Truman and the Springerville Madonna (access required)

The Springerville "Madonna of the Trail" looms 18 feet high across from the Post Office on Main Street, also known as Highway 60. She has 11 identical sisters, each in a different state: Bethesda, Md.; Beallsville, Pa.; Springfield, Ohio; Wheeling, W.Va.; Vandalia, Ill.; Richmond, Ind.; Lexington, Miss.; Council Grove, Kan.; Lamar, Colo.; Albuquerque, N.M. and Upland, Calif.

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