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Rifleys — Father and Son (access required)

Rifleys — Father and Son <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

This photo, showing father and son in boxing gloves, was taken in Phoenix about 1922. It reflects Jack Dempsey’s dynamic effect on American culture. A comparatively small man, Dempsey electrified the nation in 1919 by winning the heavyweight championship, knocking out the gigantic Jess Willard in just three roundsc — an event that launched America’s Golden Age of Sports.

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Flagstaff’s Tree-Ring Study Pioneers (access required)

Flagstaff’s Tree-Ring Study Pioneers <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Within the small scientific circle in Flagstaff in the 1920s were three men who combined their expertise to develop the science known today as dendrochronology, or tree-ring dating: astronomer Dr. Andrew E. Douglass (1867-1962); forester Gustaf A. Pearson (1880 -1949) and zoologist Dr. Harold S. Colton (1889-1970). Each man would become well-known and respected for this project and other scientific achievements in northern Arizona during their tenures.

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Fort Grant

Fort Grant

In 1885, when Geronimo and the Chiricahua Apaches were raiding in southern Arizona, the 10th Cavalry was transferred from Texas to Forts Grant, Thomas, Apache and Verde in the Arizona Territory. (The 10th was one of the cavalry regiments organized with black troops after the Civil War. Indians called the men Buffalo Soldiers after their short curly hair.) The men of the 10th sent to Fort Grant had been given one of the most desirable postings in the Arizona Territory.

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A Bisbee First: Birdman Fowler (access required)

A Bisbee First: Birdman Fowler <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

In November 1911, R.L. “Birdman” Fowler made a stop at the Bisbee Country Club on a cross-country air trip and became the first man to fly into the copper mining camp (Didier Masson, whose plane appears in this photo, was the first to fly out of Bisbee in February 1911, but his biplane was shipped into Bisbee by railroad.) Fowler had only been flying for three months, but already had broken records. On the Yuma to Maricopa leg of his trip, he flew continuously for four hours and 26 minutes, longer than any other aviator to that date.

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Transitioning Tucson (access required)

Transitioning Tucson <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Looking northeast toward the barely visible Santa Catalina Mountains is Tucson in the early 1880s. The photograph, probably taken from the lower steps of Sentinel Peak, shows an evolving Tucson.

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The Flying Schoolgirl (access required)

The Flying Schoolgirl <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Katherine Stinson was born Feb. 14, 1896, in Jackson, Miss. As a young woman, she hoped to become a piano teacher and planned to study music in Europe, but lacked the money for the trip. For some reason, she fixed on becoming a stunt pilot as a quick way to earn cash. However, to pay the $500 cost of flying lessons, her family had to sell the piano. That might have been a hardship for Stinson, except that it turned out she liked flying so much she abandoned her music career for aviation.

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Bisbee Pioneers at the Norton House (access required)

Bisbee Pioneers at the Norton House <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

On May 21, 1906, this group of Bisbee residents gathered in front of the Norton House hotel on Main Street for a commemorative photograph. With the exception of the children, all the residents had arrived in Bisbee in the 1800s, and were friends and acquaintances of E.G. Norton, who owned the Norton House and was leaving Bisbee to retire in Maine.

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Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels (access required)

Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Annie Evalena Stakebake Seayrs Daniels, a schoolteacher and Pima County superintendent of schools, was born in a log cabin on a farm near Windsor, Randolph County, Ind., on Oct. 3, 1869. Her parents were Henry Harrison and Louisa Cropper Stakebake.

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