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Tucson Mayor William Armine Julian

William Armine (W. A.) Julian arrived in Tucson in 1899 at age 34 from San Diego with his wife Margaret. He promptly opened the W. A. Julian Company in a two-story building featuring a handsome facade of granite and pressed brick and several large show windows at 122 E. Congress. The business would eventually control 85 percent of Tucson’s plumbing, heating and roofing business. He also sold Charter Oak stoves, crockery, glassware and solar water heaters.

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Buckey O’Neill and the A&P Train Robbery (access required)

Buckey O’Neill had been a newspaper reporter with the Tombstone Epitaph when the OK Corral shootout occurred in 1881. The following year he moved to Prescott and worked as a court reporter and founded his own newspaper, Hoof and Horn, serving the livestock industry. He became captain of a local unit of the Arizona militia in 1886 and was elected Yavapai County sheriff in 1888.

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La Posada Station Hotel, Winslow (access required)

The La Posada station hotel in Winslow was operated by concessionaire Fred Harvey, designed by architect and artist Mary Colter, and was one of the most expensive hotel projects undertaken by the Santa Fe Railroad. It was also one of the last of the southwest railroad hotels built as overnight stopovers on the Santa Fe line. (La Posada means resting place in Spanish.)

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Tuba City’s Tithing House (access required)

At the turn of the century, about 20 Mormon families lived in the Tuba City, Moenkopi Wash, Reservoir Wash and Moenave areas of northern Arizona. The families farmed and raised livestock and followed the church practice of tithing — giving one tenth of the increase in their income or goods each year to the Mormon Church.

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Bringing Water to the South Rim (access required)

Common sense dictates that settlement near the south rim of the Grand Canyon should never have occurred, as the area lacks a permanent groundwater supply. As part of the Coconino Plateau, the rim slopes away from the canyon toward the southwest and precipitation drains away from the edge of the gorge. Yet the mystique and splendor of the Grand Canyon have always drawn adventurers and the curious, which ultimately led to the establishment of a community known as Grand Canyon Village.

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The Other Heroes of War (access required)

The soldier heroes of war are immortalized in bronze and stone, shouldering weapons, riding great steeds and urging their forces toward battle. Yet courage in war is not limited to adult males. Women and children also act in bold and noble ways in war. The Mexican Revolution (1911-1920) was no exception.

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Barbering Badmen (access required)

A barber by trade, Emil Marks trimmed the hair and mustaches of Tombstone’s most notorious gunfighters, including the Earps, ‘Doc’ Holliday and the Clantons.

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The Power Shootout (access required)

The Power family — Thomas Jefferson Power Sr., sons Charlie, John, Tom Jr., and daughter Ola May settled in Kielburg Canyon deep in the Galiuro Mountains of Graham County in 1907. The men ranched, but also gained a controlling interest in a mining claim variously known as the Jinx Mine, the Abandoned Claims and the Power Mine.

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Healer of the Lonely Dell (access required)

On Christmas Day in 1871, Emma Batchelor Lee, her soon-to-be infamous husband, and six young children arrived at a desolate location next to the Colorado River in between Grand and Glen canyons that would become their new home. She originally called the site ‘Lonely Dell,’ but the area would become better known as Lee’s Ferry.

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