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Tag Archives: Arizona Historical Society

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Queen of the Colorado (access required)

This Mohave was the largest and most palatial of the paddle-wheelers on the Colorado River a century ago. The photo was taken in 1876, when the Mohave was docked at Yuma taking on school children for a May Day excursion. The ship had been launched earlier that year, replacing a smaller boat (also called the Mohave) that had been dismantled and completely rebuilt.

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Old Main: No Running on the Balcony (access required)

During the first session of the Arizona Territorial Legislature in 1864 — when not a single public school existed in the newly formed territory — lawmakers authorized a university and wrote a constitution to guide its affairs.

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Building the Kaibab Bridge, 1921 (access required)

The Kaibab suspension bridge over the Colorado River was to link Bright Angel Trail on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon with the Kaibab Trail on the North Rim. At the time, the only means of crossing the river between the two trails was by small canvas boat. (The closest ferry crossings were at Lee’s Ferry, upstream near the Utah border and downstream at Needles on the California border.) Construction began in January 1921.

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Specialty license plates run amok (access required)

If a cactus and sunset don’t suit a driver, Arizonans can now opt for one of the 49 specialty plates when they register their cars.

But some call the numerous specialty plates, including the ironic Tea Party plate and one for the embattled Phoenix Coyotes, a threat to public safety and private groups using the government to pad their bottom lines.

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The Pyramid of Hi Jolly (access required)

Hi Jolly’s pyramid may not be the only pyramid in Arizona, but its composition of quartz and petrified wood along with its unusual metal silhouette of a camel perched on top makes it one of the state’s most notable monuments. Thousands travel past it every day but few realize it’s there.

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