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Tag Archives: Arizona history

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Fiscal conservatism and the future of the Republican Party

It doesn't take a DC insider to know that conservatives are in a battle for the soul for the Republican Party. It is a battle for the future of fiscal responsibility in America. It's a battle between the George W. Bush wing of the Republican Party and the Reagan/Goldwater conservatism that made our nation the strongest, most prosperous and freest in the world.

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Phoenix baseball hit crossroads in 1950s (access required)

In the mid-1950s, the future of baseball in Phoenix seemed to be on the line as the city was trying to purchase Phoenix Municipal Stadium. Allerton Cushman and his wife owned approximately 10 acres around what was then called Phoenix Municipal Stadium at Third and Mohave streets south of downtown Phoenix. The 100 Club owned the Phoenix Senators that played at the stadium.

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The short-lived Papago Saguaro National Monument (access required)

Shortly after statehood in 1912, the Phoenix and Maricopa County Board of Trade began an effort to have what is now Papago Park declared either a national park or a national monument. Originally, the committee recommended the creation of a "National Cactus Park" just like Yellowstone National Park, the Yosemite National Park and the Mount Rainer National Park."

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Flagstaff’s early opposition to Forest Reserves (access required)

"Hell and another Forest Reserve has been created at Flagstaff." This phrase greeted Fred S. Breen in August, 1898, at the railroad stop in Laury Junction, N.M. Breen was en route to report as supervisor of the Prescott Forest Reserve in Arizona, but was intercepted by U.S. Forest Service Superintendent John D. Benedict, who rerouted Breen to Flagstaff.

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Pioneer Aviators (access required)

In 1916, four men were assigned to fly reconnaissance with General John "Blackjack" Pershing's punitive expeditionary forces in Mexico to help chase Pancho Villa. Ira Rader, John B. Brooks, Ralph Royce and Arthur Reed Christie were among America's earliest military aviators and were frequent visitors to Davis Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson.

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Wanted: 10 Explorers! (access required)

During the summer of 1933, a scientific reconnaissance project, "Rainbow Bridge/Monument Valley Expedition" (RBMVE) began in the remote reaches of northeastern Arizona. The idea was conceived by Ansel Franklin Hall of the National Park Service, following a suggestion by U.S. Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes.

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Admission Day (access required)

Admission Day is a nearly forgotten day in the history of Arizona. Sept. 26, 1864, was the date "men, by organizing and beginning work, brought American government to the newest unit of America."

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The Globe flood of 1904 (access required)

The rain began as a gentle shower. An hour later, six people were drowned and the damages amounted to half-a-million dollars. They called it the Globe flood, but the official government name was the Pinal Creek Flood, since it was the creek that did the flooding, not the town.

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Water: Feast and famine in early Phoenix (access required)

Irrigation helped make Phoenix an attractive place to live for many of the pioneers who were heading west to California in the 1800s. Mrs. Columbus Gray started toward California with her husband in 1868 in a wagon train from Arkansas.

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