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Will C. Barnes (access required)

Will Croft Barnes is best remembered for his concluding opus, “Arizona Place Names,” a book published in 1935, preceding his death a few months later. The book is still in print, which is a testament to its enduring value to both readers and scholars.

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McKinley’s visit to Congress (access required)

At first glance, the portly gentleman with hands clasped behind his back might be taken for an aging schoolmaster scolding errant children at recess. But he was not an educator and the youngsters pictured here were on their best behavior. They were, after all, hobnobbing with a man named William McKinley who was president of the United States.

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Escaping from the Phoenix Indian School (access required)

Anglos moving into the Arizona Territory during the late 1800s believed that the Native Americans already there should be acclimated into Anglo culture. During that time, Indian boarding schools were built and native children were removed from their homes and placed into these schools. For one Hopi, however, going to the Phoenix Indian School was a choice he made reluctantly out of respect for his grandfather and because he believed he would find a book full of knowledge. But he didn’t stay long.

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Bisbee’s Miners and Merchants Bank (access required)

The Miners and Merchants Bank on Bisbee’s Main Street incorporated on June 12, 1900, with a capitalization of $50,000. Founding directors were Bisbee merchants L.C. Shattuck, Joseph Muheim, L.J. Overlock, Jakob Schmidt and J.T. Hood.

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Fort Defiance (access required)

Fort Defiance, established in 1851, was the first military post established in what would become the Arizona Territory, and its post office, established in 1856, provided the future territory’s first postal service.

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Global Influence (access required)

“It says here Aunt Susie died,” said George Smalley, reading a letter from home at the family dinner table. “Oh, who shot her?” asked his daughter Yndia. It seemed like everyone died that way in Globe in those days.

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Brief rise and fall of the Arizona Cattle Company (access required)

Hidden behind buildings and a school playground along busy Highway 180 in Flagstaff is one of the few remaining historic barns in Arizona. If the walls could talk, they would tell of the ranching life in the 1880s and the quick rise and fall of its probable builders, the Arizona Cattle Company.

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