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Tag Archives: Grand Canyon National Park

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Veit Springs: A Home on the Mountain (access required)

An early resident in the Flagstaff area was German Ludwig Veit (pronounced Wait) who homesteaded at 8,500 feet on a slope of Mt. Agassiz, one of the peaks of San Francisco Mountain. He received a patent to the 160-acre parcel in 1891. Two springs and a relatively flat area to farm prompted Veit to select the unlikely spot where he and his family lived for two decades. Their nearest human neighbors were five miles away in Hart Prairie or Fort Valley, many of whom were also of German descent. The property then became a bird study area and later, the Lamar Haines Memorial Environmental Study Area.

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Bringing Water to the South Rim (access required)

Common sense dictates that settlement near the south rim of the Grand Canyon should never have occurred, as the area lacks a permanent groundwater supply. As part of the Coconino Plateau, the rim slopes away from the canyon toward the southwest and precipitation drains away from the edge of the gorge. Yet the mystique and splendor of the Grand Canyon have always drawn adventurers and the curious, which ultimately led to the establishment of a community known as Grand Canyon Village.

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Kaibab Plateau – The Waterless Mountain (access required)

The road from Jacob Lake to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is a lovely journey through grassy parks surrounded by spruce and fir trees at a an altitude of more than 8,000 feet. The pleasant coolness refreshes after travelling through the beautiful, yet harsh, high desert of the Vermillion Cliffs and House Rock Valley. The lack of streams and lakes on the plateau has limited human settlement there, yet there is enough snowfall to allow trees and grasses to thrive.

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Protecting flows of Colorado River protects local economies

By the very nature of a desert climate, much of the West is challenged to get adequate access to life-giving water. Certainly with the ballooning population growth we’ve experienced in the Southwest, our largest source of water — the Colorado River — has become severely over extended. Add climate change and an 11-year drought, and the entire Colorado River basin is under siege like never before, with demand far exceeding supply and water storage reserves almost half empty.

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