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Protecting flows of Colorado River protects local economies

By the very nature of a desert climate, much of the West is challenged to get adequate access to life-giving water. Certainly with the ballooning population growth we’ve experienced in the Southwest, our largest source of water — the Colorado River — has become severely over extended. Add climate change and an 11-year drought, and the entire Colorado River basin is under siege like never before, with demand far exceeding supply and water storage reserves almost half empty.

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Protect clean air, develop clean energy

By supporting a transition to new, clean energy projects in our state and ensuring that existing coal plants reduce their pollution, we can restore and protect the clean air and scenic views that attract visitors to the Grand Canyon, Petrified Forest, and other now-polluted parks in the region.

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Building the Kaibab Bridge, 1921

The Kaibab suspension bridge over the Colorado River was to link Bright Angel Trail on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon with the Kaibab Trail on the North Rim. At the time, the only means of crossing the river between the two trails was by small canvas boat. (The closest ferry crossings were at Lee’s Ferry, upstream near the Utah border and downstream at Needles on the California border.) Construction began in January 1921.

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Federal plan to close land won’t end uranium mining near Grand Canyon

Deep within the canyon, a few miles removed from the mule trains of the popular Bright Angel Trail, Horn Creek creates a ribbon of green vegetation here before plunging toward the Colorado River.

But the handful of people allowed to camp in this splendid isolation receive a warning with their permits: Don’t drink the water when Horn Creek is flowing. It’s radioactive.

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As public universities hike tuition, private Grand Canyon University stands pat

At Arizona’s public universities, incoming resident students will pay from $8,474 to $9,716 a year in tuition and fees come fall thanks to state funding cuts. That’s an increase of 45 percent to 72 percent since the 2008-2009 school year, depending on the university.

But at Grand Canyon University, a private Christian institution, tuition, while higher at $16,500 a year, isn’t changing and hasn’t since 2009.

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