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Flagstaff Mill Pond (access required)

Flagstaff Mill Pond <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

The logs were hauled from nearby forests by steam locomotive, off-loaded by crane (right foreground) and floated in the mill pond of the Flagstaff lumber mill until they were selected for cutting. The tiny figure on the far edge of the pond is a mill worker choosing logs for the conveyor to the second floor of the saw mill.

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Paradise, Arizona (access required)

Paradise, Arizona <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

This is the main thoroughfare of Paradise, Arizona, photographed sometime after the turn of the century. Note the boy running toward the hotel at right, the burro grazing in the street, another tied under the tree and the collection of barrels spilling over with things unknown.

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The Douglas Trolleys (access required)

The Douglas Trolleys <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Landmarks along G Avenue, the main street of Douglas, Arizona, are the Phelps Dodge Mercantile store at left, the Gadsden Hotel next to it (which burned down in 1928 and was rebuilt in 1930) and the Bank of Douglas on the corner at right.

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First Catholic School in the Territory (access required)

First Catholic School in the Territory <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

The original St. Joseph’s Academy (called the Convent School) was established in 1868 adjacent to Tucson’s old St. Augustine Cathedral. It was a thick-walled adobe building, built in the “fashion of the country’’ with earthen floors and a roof of sagebrush and cactus interfaced on pine rafters and covered with mud.

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Steamboats on the Colorado (access required)

Steamboats on the Colorado <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Impressive as the steamboat Gila appears, Martha Summerhays, an Army wife who journeyed on the boat in 1874, described the steamer in less than glorious terms: “We had staterooms, but could not remain in them long on account of the intense heat. After a hasty meal and a few remarks upon the salt beef and the general misery of our lot, we could seek some spot which might be a trifle cooler. Conversation lagged; no topic seems to have any interest except the thermometer, which hung in the coolest place on the boat; and one day when Major Worth looked at it and pronounced it 122 degrees in the shade, a grim despair seized upon me.”

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Amelia Earhart in Arizona (access required)

Amelia Earhart in Arizona <span class="dmcss_key_icon"><img alt="(access required)" src="/files/2013/12/lock1.png" border=0/></span>

Earhart’s destination was Los Angeles, where a national air meet was in progress. Attempting to avoid publicity, she chose small out-of-the-way landing fields for refueling stops. Her landing in McNeal on September 12, 1928, was a surprise to the community.

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