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Tag Archives: Museum of Northern Arizona

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‘…Going Sketching Now, Will Write Again Soon…’ (access required)

The above quote is from artist Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton in a letter to her mother in Philadelphia. Colton was among the Eastern born and trained artists who relocated to Arizona in the early 20th century to experience for themselves the surreal colors in the ever-changing panorama of Arizona landscapes, the native peoples, and regional uniqueness. Their painting canvases attempted to capture what they saw. Some stayed only briefly while others remained for their lifetimes.

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Escaping from the Phoenix Indian School (access required)

Anglos moving into the Arizona Territory during the late 1800s believed that the Native Americans already there should be acclimated into Anglo culture. During that time, Indian boarding schools were built and native children were removed from their homes and placed into these schools. For one Hopi, however, going to the Phoenix Indian School was a choice he made reluctantly out of respect for his grandfather and because he believed he would find a book full of knowledge. But he didn’t stay long.

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The ‘Hart’ of Hart Prairie (access required)

On the western slopes of the San Francisco Peaks near Flagstaff is a beautiful area known as Hart Prairie. Its 8,500-foot elevation suggests short summers and long, cold winters, but surprisingly; it was one of the first areas around Flagstaff to be homesteaded because of its lush grasses, bountiful timber and readily available water.

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A Pueblo By Any Other Name (access required)

While on a horseback near Flagstaff’s Elden Mountain in the fall of 1916, Mary Russell-Ferrell Colton made an impressive discovery that would eventually lead to a years-long naming battle between colleagues.

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